June 12-19

 
 
Food trucks aren’t necessarily a seasonal thing, but eating outside is definitely more appealing in the warmer months than in the colder ones. With that in mind, the Summit (1400 Enterprise Dr.) is hosting a series of Wyndhurst Wednesdays food truck round-ups over the next few months. It all starts today on the Summit’s North Lawn, where there should be plenty of room for picnic blankets and lawn chairs. The rain-or-shine event runs from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. and will feature a selection of local food trucks that have yet to be announced. We do, however, have it on good word that the Mama Crockett’s donut (or doughnut) truck will be out in Wyndhurst from 7 a.m.-1 p.m. Click  here  for more info on Wyndhurst Wednesdays or call (434) 582-1500.

Food trucks aren’t necessarily a seasonal thing, but eating outside is definitely more appealing in the warmer months than in the colder ones. With that in mind, the Summit (1400 Enterprise Dr.) is hosting a series of Wyndhurst Wednesdays food truck round-ups over the next few months. It all starts today on the Summit’s North Lawn, where there should be plenty of room for picnic blankets and lawn chairs. The rain-or-shine event runs from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. and will feature a selection of local food trucks that have yet to be announced. We do, however, have it on good word that the Mama Crockett’s donut (or doughnut) truck will be out in Wyndhurst from 7 a.m.-1 p.m. Click here for more info on Wyndhurst Wednesdays or call (434) 582-1500.

Mitch Albom is best known as a longtime sports columnist for the  Detroit Free Press  and a former regular on the ESPN Sunday-morning gabfest  The Sports Reporters . But he’s got other interests. In 1997, he published a philosophical memoir recounting a series of Tuesday morning conversations with his former sociology professor at Brandeis University, Morrie Schwartz. The book was filled with quippy little nuggets like, “Forgive yourself before you die; then forgive others,” and “Love is how you stay alive, even after you’re gone.” The book became a made-for-TV movie and then a play that opened Off Broadway in 2002. Now it’s being performed at the Miller Center (301 Grove St.) under the direction of Endstation Theatre Company. Givens Books (2236 Lakeside Dr.) has stocked extra copies of the book for those who’d like to read it before seeing it. Performances are tonight, tomorrow, and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Tickets run from $18 to $31. Click  here  for tickets and info or call (434) 226-0686.

Mitch Albom is best known as a longtime sports columnist for the Detroit Free Press and a former regular on the ESPN Sunday-morning gabfest The Sports Reporters. But he’s got other interests. In 1997, he published a philosophical memoir recounting a series of Tuesday morning conversations with his former sociology professor at Brandeis University, Morrie Schwartz. The book was filled with quippy little nuggets like, “Forgive yourself before you die; then forgive others,” and “Love is how you stay alive, even after you’re gone.” The book became a made-for-TV movie and then a play that opened Off Broadway in 2002. Now it’s being performed at the Miller Center (301 Grove St.) under the direction of Endstation Theatre Company. Givens Books (2236 Lakeside Dr.) has stocked extra copies of the book for those who’d like to read it before seeing it. Performances are tonight, tomorrow, and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Tickets run from $18 to $31. Click here for tickets and info or call (434) 226-0686.

There are at least half a dozen fairly inventive murders that take place over the course of  A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder , a Broadway musical comedy that won four of the nine Tony Awards it was nominated for in 2013. There’s love too, but most of the drama centers around a certain Lord Monty, an ambitious victim of circumstance and poor planning who finds himself in a London jail writing a memoir about his mock Dostoyevskian descent into petty intrigue and murder. It’s the type of amusingly dark and sinister drama that’s well suited to the thespians at Appomattox’s Wolfbane Productions. They’re sinking their teeth into it this month with a production at their Wolf Den (197 Old Courthouse Rd.). Tickets are $35 for premium seats, $25 for general admission, and $20 for students, seniors, and members of the military. Performances continue through June 29 on Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 6 p.m., with doors opening an hour before curtain. Click  here  or call (434) 579-3542 for tickets and info.

There are at least half a dozen fairly inventive murders that take place over the course of A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder, a Broadway musical comedy that won four of the nine Tony Awards it was nominated for in 2013. There’s love too, but most of the drama centers around a certain Lord Monty, an ambitious victim of circumstance and poor planning who finds himself in a London jail writing a memoir about his mock Dostoyevskian descent into petty intrigue and murder. It’s the type of amusingly dark and sinister drama that’s well suited to the thespians at Appomattox’s Wolfbane Productions. They’re sinking their teeth into it this month with a production at their Wolf Den (197 Old Courthouse Rd.). Tickets are $35 for premium seats, $25 for general admission, and $20 for students, seniors, and members of the military. Performances continue through June 29 on Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 6 p.m., with doors opening an hour before curtain. Click here or call (434) 579-3542 for tickets and info.

Out in the tiny town of Lovingston, the county seat of Nelson County, they’ve got a distillery, a brewery, a winery, and a coffee bean roastery. They’ve also got Drumheller’s Orchard (1130 Drumheller Orchard Ln.), where they grow peaches, apples, blackberries, and blueberries. Peach season won’t be at its peak until July, and apples are autumnal. But the berries should be ripe for the picking right about now. It’s open season on the blueberries and blackberries starting today from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m. Click  here  for more info or call (434) 263-5036.

Out in the tiny town of Lovingston, the county seat of Nelson County, they’ve got a distillery, a brewery, a winery, and a coffee bean roastery. They’ve also got Drumheller’s Orchard (1130 Drumheller Orchard Ln.), where they grow peaches, apples, blackberries, and blueberries. Peach season won’t be at its peak until July, and apples are autumnal. But the berries should be ripe for the picking right about now. It’s open season on the blueberries and blackberries starting today from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m. Click here for more info or call (434) 263-5036.

Technically, the 34th Annual James River Batteau Festival gets underway around 10 a.m. tomorrow morning, when a fleet of 18th-century  batteau -style wooden cargo vessels and their crews will make their way over from the Amherst side of the James to Percival’s Island (1600 Concord Turnpike) to begin an eight-day downriver trip to Richmond. It’s quite a sight, and there will be vendors and live music leading up to the official launch at 11 a.m. However, Lynchburg Parks and Rec is throwing a launch party this evening to get everyone in the old-timey mood with a little square dancing. The dance runs from 7-9 p.m. at Riverfront Park (1000 Jefferson St.). Partners are not required and beginners are welcome. Tickets are $5 in advance and $8 at the gate. Children under six get in free. Click  here  for more info on the square dance, or call (434) 455-5858. Click  here  for details on the Batteau Festival.

Technically, the 34th Annual James River Batteau Festival gets underway around 10 a.m. tomorrow morning, when a fleet of 18th-century batteau-style wooden cargo vessels and their crews will make their way over from the Amherst side of the James to Percival’s Island (1600 Concord Turnpike) to begin an eight-day downriver trip to Richmond. It’s quite a sight, and there will be vendors and live music leading up to the official launch at 11 a.m. However, Lynchburg Parks and Rec is throwing a launch party this evening to get everyone in the old-timey mood with a little square dancing. The dance runs from 7-9 p.m. at Riverfront Park (1000 Jefferson St.). Partners are not required and beginners are welcome. Tickets are $5 in advance and $8 at the gate. Children under six get in free. Click here for more info on the square dance, or call (434) 455-5858. Click here for details on the Batteau Festival.

Tomorrow evening at 5 p.m., the funkiest of Lynchburg’s funksters – Tony Camm & the Funk All Stars – will be headlining the Rock the Bridge festival under the Nelson Street Bridge on Main Street in Lexington, which runs from 5-9 p.m. This evening, they’ll be warming up with a couple of sets at Jimmy’s on the James (610 Commerce St.), a fine dining establishment conveniently located right around the corner from the John Lynch Memorial Bridge. Camm and his All Stars specialize in the works of Parliament and Funkadelic, but they’ve added some Grateful Dead jams to their repertoire of late. Tonight’s show gets underway at 10 p.m. Click  here  for more info or call (434) 845-1166. For more info on Rock the Bridge, click  here .

Tomorrow evening at 5 p.m., the funkiest of Lynchburg’s funksters – Tony Camm & the Funk All Stars – will be headlining the Rock the Bridge festival under the Nelson Street Bridge on Main Street in Lexington, which runs from 5-9 p.m. This evening, they’ll be warming up with a couple of sets at Jimmy’s on the James (610 Commerce St.), a fine dining establishment conveniently located right around the corner from the John Lynch Memorial Bridge. Camm and his All Stars specialize in the works of Parliament and Funkadelic, but they’ve added some Grateful Dead jams to their repertoire of late. Tonight’s show gets underway at 10 p.m. Click here for more info or call (434) 845-1166. For more info on Rock the Bridge, click here.

Humans tend to enjoy the scent of lavender, a familiar herbaceous flowering plant with medicinal, culinary, and ornamental uses and a history dating back to the  Song of Solomon  in the Old Testament. However, mosquitoes and other flying pests apparently do not prefer lavender, which makes it a relatively benign insect repellent. They’ve got plenty of lavender at Evergreen Lavender Farm (7169 Old Evergreen Rd.) in Appomattox, and they’re celebrating lavender season today with their annual Lavender Festival. In addition to a paucity of mosquitoes, the festival will feature folk and bluegrass music by Mountain Highway and the Tin Can Fish Band, a whole bunch of food trucks (Good Waffles & Co., Uprooted, the Taco Wagon, and Sourdough Pizza Co.), wine tastings courtesy of Sans Soucy Vineyards, and lavender picking. The event runs from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Admission is $10; kids 12 and under get in for free. Click  here  for more info or call (434) 352-9562.

Humans tend to enjoy the scent of lavender, a familiar herbaceous flowering plant with medicinal, culinary, and ornamental uses and a history dating back to the Song of Solomon in the Old Testament. However, mosquitoes and other flying pests apparently do not prefer lavender, which makes it a relatively benign insect repellent. They’ve got plenty of lavender at Evergreen Lavender Farm (7169 Old Evergreen Rd.) in Appomattox, and they’re celebrating lavender season today with their annual Lavender Festival. In addition to a paucity of mosquitoes, the festival will feature folk and bluegrass music by Mountain Highway and the Tin Can Fish Band, a whole bunch of food trucks (Good Waffles & Co., Uprooted, the Taco Wagon, and Sourdough Pizza Co.), wine tastings courtesy of Sans Soucy Vineyards, and lavender picking. The event runs from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Admission is $10; kids 12 and under get in for free. Click here for more info or call (434) 352-9562.

There were over 120 official battles fought in Virginia during the American Civil War — more than in any other state. The Battle of Lynchburg, which took place on June 17 and 18, 1864 is not among the best known, and it was certainly overshadowed by decisive events that took place just down the road at Appomattox Court House a little less than a year later. However, for the estimated 800 soldiers who were either killed or wounded when the Union Army of West Virginia under the command of General David Hunter attempted to capture Lynchburg, the Battle of Lynchburg wasn’t just a minor skirmish. To commemorate the 155th anniversary of the battle, the Taylor-Wilson Camp #10 Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War participate in reenactments as part of a commemoration featuring live music and living history presentations at Historic Sandusky (757 Sandusky Dr.), a museum located in the historic home that General Hunter used as his headquarters in June of 1864. The event, which runs from 10 a.m.-4 p.m., is free, but museum tours are $5 for adults, $3 for seniors, and $2 for students. Click  here  for more info or call (434) 832-0162.

There were over 120 official battles fought in Virginia during the American Civil War — more than in any other state. The Battle of Lynchburg, which took place on June 17 and 18, 1864 is not among the best known, and it was certainly overshadowed by decisive events that took place just down the road at Appomattox Court House a little less than a year later. However, for the estimated 800 soldiers who were either killed or wounded when the Union Army of West Virginia under the command of General David Hunter attempted to capture Lynchburg, the Battle of Lynchburg wasn’t just a minor skirmish. To commemorate the 155th anniversary of the battle, the Taylor-Wilson Camp #10 Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War participate in reenactments as part of a commemoration featuring live music and living history presentations at Historic Sandusky (757 Sandusky Dr.), a museum located in the historic home that General Hunter used as his headquarters in June of 1864. The event, which runs from 10 a.m.-4 p.m., is free, but museum tours are $5 for adults, $3 for seniors, and $2 for students. Click here for more info or call (434) 832-0162.

It’s a full-on local rock extravaganza this evening at Rivermont Pizza (2496 Rivermont Ave.). The ladies (and the guys) who comprise L.A. Dies, an indie band whose 2017 EP  The Sound of Everyone Breathing in at Once  can be sampled  here , are the nominal headliners of the show, which gets underway at 11 p.m. The more dude-heavy emo-punk band Lahey, who have an EP recorded live at the Ellington out this week that you can find  here , and the local foursome Car Cassette are the openers. There’s a $3 cover at the door. Click  here  for more info, or call (434) 846-2877.

It’s a full-on local rock extravaganza this evening at Rivermont Pizza (2496 Rivermont Ave.). The ladies (and the guys) who comprise L.A. Dies, an indie band whose 2017 EP The Sound of Everyone Breathing in at Once can be sampled here, are the nominal headliners of the show, which gets underway at 11 p.m. The more dude-heavy emo-punk band Lahey, who have an EP recorded live at the Ellington out this week that you can find here, and the local foursome Car Cassette are the openers. There’s a $3 cover at the door. Click here for more info, or call (434) 846-2877.

The US Women’s National Soccer Team won the first ever Women’s World Cup competition 28 years ago with a 2-1 victory over Norway. They’ve won it twice since, in 1999 and 2015. And they went into this year’s World Cup as FIFA’s number one ranked team. Today they’ll go up against 39th ranked Chile in group play at noon.  FiveThirtyEight.com  has the US at over 99% to make the round of 16, and at 70% to make the quarter finals. They’ve also got France, Germany, England, and the Netherlands at over 99% for the round of 16, and they’re giving France, the hosts of this year’s tourney, a slightly better chance than the US to win the whole thing. The Water Dog (1016 Jefferson St.), which is a fine place to get a beer, a burger, freshly shucked oysters, and a “Chicago dog,” and other consumables, are committed to showing all of the matches. Click  here  for more info or call (434) 333-4681.

The US Women’s National Soccer Team won the first ever Women’s World Cup competition 28 years ago with a 2-1 victory over Norway. They’ve won it twice since, in 1999 and 2015. And they went into this year’s World Cup as FIFA’s number one ranked team. Today they’ll go up against 39th ranked Chile in group play at noon. FiveThirtyEight.com has the US at over 99% to make the round of 16, and at 70% to make the quarter finals. They’ve also got France, Germany, England, and the Netherlands at over 99% for the round of 16, and they’re giving France, the hosts of this year’s tourney, a slightly better chance than the US to win the whole thing. The Water Dog (1016 Jefferson St.), which is a fine place to get a beer, a burger, freshly shucked oysters, and a “Chicago dog,” and other consumables, are committed to showing all of the matches. Click here for more info or call (434) 333-4681.

The 2nd Annual World Axe Throwing Championship was held in Chicago last year on December 15, and among the lumberjacks and lumberjills who placed high in the standing, none were from the state of Virginia. That’s good news for the competitors in a four-week, Lynchburg Axe Throwing League tournament that gets underway today at Fifth and Federal (801 5th St.). On Monday evenings at 5:30 p.m., Lynchburg’s best axe throwers will be given the opportunity to throw their axes, which is done using either a one- or two-handed overhead technique, and hopefully hit the designated target. Each thrower gets 30 shots. It’s free for spectators; competitors can register by clicking  here . For more info, click  here  or call Fifth and Federal at (434) 386-8113.

The 2nd Annual World Axe Throwing Championship was held in Chicago last year on December 15, and among the lumberjacks and lumberjills who placed high in the standing, none were from the state of Virginia. That’s good news for the competitors in a four-week, Lynchburg Axe Throwing League tournament that gets underway today at Fifth and Federal (801 5th St.). On Monday evenings at 5:30 p.m., Lynchburg’s best axe throwers will be given the opportunity to throw their axes, which is done using either a one- or two-handed overhead technique, and hopefully hit the designated target. Each thrower gets 30 shots. It’s free for spectators; competitors can register by clicking here. For more info, click here or call Fifth and Federal at (434) 386-8113.

Locally sourced food, actual books, and coffee roasted by the proprietors are just some of the nice things about the White Hart Café (1208 Main St.). During the day you can grab breakfast all day, as well as lunch/dinner items (burgers, salads, sandwiches) starting at 11 a.m. In the evenings, they book live music and host other events, like a weekly Tuesday Trivia night that ends with the winner receiving a $30 White Hart gift card. Test your knowledge tonight at 7:30 p.m. It’s free to enter. Click  here  for more info or call (434) 207-5600.

Locally sourced food, actual books, and coffee roasted by the proprietors are just some of the nice things about the White Hart Café (1208 Main St.). During the day you can grab breakfast all day, as well as lunch/dinner items (burgers, salads, sandwiches) starting at 11 a.m. In the evenings, they book live music and host other events, like a weekly Tuesday Trivia night that ends with the winner receiving a $30 White Hart gift card. Test your knowledge tonight at 7:30 p.m. It’s free to enter. Click here for more info or call (434) 207-5600.

When Ken Faraoni and his Lynchburg Underground Movie Club (LUMC) start digging around for cult classics, underground hits, and left-of-center features to screen at their monthly movie night, you never know what they’re going to find. This month they’ve got a real obscurity: a 2003 French animated film about competitive cycling, mafia intrigue, and cabaret performers. Yep, it’s  The Triplets of Belleville , a somewhat existential drama concerning a depressed cyclist, a French crime boss, and a trio of musical sisters who specialize in what might be termed avant-lounge improvisation. The film, which was nominated for two Oscars in 2003 but lost Best Animated Feature to  Finding Nemo , screens in the theater at Riverviews Artspace (901 Jefferson St.) at 7 p.m. Tickets are $7. Click  here  for more info or call (434) 847-7277.

When Ken Faraoni and his Lynchburg Underground Movie Club (LUMC) start digging around for cult classics, underground hits, and left-of-center features to screen at their monthly movie night, you never know what they’re going to find. This month they’ve got a real obscurity: a 2003 French animated film about competitive cycling, mafia intrigue, and cabaret performers. Yep, it’s The Triplets of Belleville, a somewhat existential drama concerning a depressed cyclist, a French crime boss, and a trio of musical sisters who specialize in what might be termed avant-lounge improvisation. The film, which was nominated for two Oscars in 2003 but lost Best Animated Feature to Finding Nemo, screens in the theater at Riverviews Artspace (901 Jefferson St.) at 7 p.m. Tickets are $7. Click here for more info or call (434) 847-7277.