LynchburgDoes.com

June 20-27

 
 
 
 Remember when a volleyball saved Tom Hanks from having to spend a whole movie talking to himself in  Castaway ?  Swiss Army Man  (2016) is a little like that if you replace the volleyball with a decomposing body. In this case, the corpse (a/k/a Manny) is played by none other than Daniel “Harry Potter” Radcliffe in what’s fast become a cult classic. In this case, Paul Dano plays the castaway Hank and, for reasons that are hard to explain, Radcliffe does have a speaking role, as does Mary Elizabeth Winstead. Any further questions should be answered by the film itself, which screens this evening as part of the Lynchburg Underground Movie Club series at Riverviews Artspace (901 Jefferson St.). Local film buff Ken Faraoni will be on hand to add some commentary. Admission is $7, and the film screens at 7:30 p.m. For more information, click  here  or call (434) 847-7277.

Remember when a volleyball saved Tom Hanks from having to spend a whole movie talking to himself in Castaway? Swiss Army Man (2016) is a little like that if you replace the volleyball with a decomposing body. In this case, the corpse (a/k/a Manny) is played by none other than Daniel “Harry Potter” Radcliffe in what’s fast become a cult classic. In this case, Paul Dano plays the castaway Hank and, for reasons that are hard to explain, Radcliffe does have a speaking role, as does Mary Elizabeth Winstead. Any further questions should be answered by the film itself, which screens this evening as part of the Lynchburg Underground Movie Club series at Riverviews Artspace (901 Jefferson St.). Local film buff Ken Faraoni will be on hand to add some commentary. Admission is $7, and the film screens at 7:30 p.m. For more information, click here or call (434) 847-7277.

 On February 3, 1959, a plane went down in Iowa, taking the lives of Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and a dude known as the Big Bopper. Don McLean hyperbolized it as “the day the music died” in “American Pie.” It is fair to say that in an alternate universe the bespectacled Holly and his band, which at the time of his death included a guy named Waylon Jennings on guitar, might have been bigger than the Beatles before anyone outside of Hamburg had ever heard of John, Paul, George, and Ringo.  Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story  is a two-act musical that has been keeping Holly’s music alive on stages around the world since its debut at London’s Victoria Palace Theatre in 1989. Endstation Theatre Company brings Buddy to the stage at Randolph College (2500 Rivermont Ave.) for the second of a three-week run  that concludes on July 1. There are performances tonight, tomorrow, and Sunday at 7:30 p.m. The production stars Skip Robinson, a guy who’s played Johnny Cash in  Million Dollar Quartet  and Pig Pen in  A Charlie Brown Christmas , so he’s got some range. Tickets run from $17 to $33 and can be purchased by clicking  here . Call (434) 226-0686 for more info.

On February 3, 1959, a plane went down in Iowa, taking the lives of Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and a dude known as the Big Bopper. Don McLean hyperbolized it as “the day the music died” in “American Pie.” It is fair to say that in an alternate universe the bespectacled Holly and his band, which at the time of his death included a guy named Waylon Jennings on guitar, might have been bigger than the Beatles before anyone outside of Hamburg had ever heard of John, Paul, George, and Ringo. Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story is a two-act musical that has been keeping Holly’s music alive on stages around the world since its debut at London’s Victoria Palace Theatre in 1989. Endstation Theatre Company brings Buddy to the stage at Randolph College (2500 Rivermont Ave.) for the second of a three-week run  that concludes on July 1. There are performances tonight, tomorrow, and Sunday at 7:30 p.m. The production stars Skip Robinson, a guy who’s played Johnny Cash in Million Dollar Quartet and Pig Pen in A Charlie Brown Christmas, so he’s got some range. Tickets run from $17 to $33 and can be purchased by clicking here. Call (434) 226-0686 for more info.

 As a gofer at a run-down florist shop, Rick Moranis doesn’t have much going for him as Seymour Krelborn in the 1986 big-screen adaptation of the stage musical comedy  Little Shop of Horrors . Basically, he lives in the basement and is treated horribly by Vincent Gardenia, who plays the shop’s owner. To make matters worse, Krelborn is in love with coworker Audrey, who is in a relationship with the sadistic, gas-sucking dentist played by Steve Martin. Seymour’s salvation comes in the form of a mysterious plant – a large Venus flytrap named Audrey II that has a bit of a taste for human blood. Hilarity and song ensue. The film is playing through Thursday at Venue Cinemas (901 Lakeside Dr.) at noon, 2:15, 4:30, 6:45, and 9 p.m. Click  here  or call (434) 845-2398 for tickets and info.

As a gofer at a run-down florist shop, Rick Moranis doesn’t have much going for him as Seymour Krelborn in the 1986 big-screen adaptation of the stage musical comedy Little Shop of Horrors. Basically, he lives in the basement and is treated horribly by Vincent Gardenia, who plays the shop’s owner. To make matters worse, Krelborn is in love with coworker Audrey, who is in a relationship with the sadistic, gas-sucking dentist played by Steve Martin. Seymour’s salvation comes in the form of a mysterious plant – a large Venus flytrap named Audrey II that has a bit of a taste for human blood. Hilarity and song ensue. The film is playing through Thursday at Venue Cinemas (901 Lakeside Dr.) at noon, 2:15, 4:30, 6:45, and 9 p.m. Click here or call (434) 845-2398 for tickets and info.

 The view of downtown Lynchburg has changed quite a bit as restaurants and bars fill storefronts left empty for quite some time. Among the most recent is  Skyline Grill  (712 Church St.), which sits atop the completely renovated and recently opened Virginian Hotel. Tonight is as good a night as any to check out Lynchburg’s only tower-top cocktail bar, and the Young Professionals of Central Virginia will be in the house for their monthly 5:35 Networking Happy Hour. The group does its best to connect, attract, and retain young talent in the community. The event starts at 5:35 p.m. No membership or fee is required to attend. For more information about the event click  here , and you can find out more about the Skyline Grill’s menu by clicking  here  or by calling the Virginian at (434) 329-3200.

The view of downtown Lynchburg has changed quite a bit as restaurants and bars fill storefronts left empty for quite some time. Among the most recent is Skyline Grill (712 Church St.), which sits atop the completely renovated and recently opened Virginian Hotel. Tonight is as good a night as any to check out Lynchburg’s only tower-top cocktail bar, and the Young Professionals of Central Virginia will be in the house for their monthly 5:35 Networking Happy Hour. The group does its best to connect, attract, and retain young talent in the community. The event starts at 5:35 p.m. No membership or fee is required to attend. For more information about the event click here, and you can find out more about the Skyline Grill’s menu by clicking here or by calling the Virginian at (434) 329-3200.

 Believe it or not, there’s one day a year set aside just for skateboarding. While the “holiday” hasn’t quite yet made it to federal day-off-work status, Scene 3 (1107 Main St.) is getting the local skate community together for a group skate from 6-9 p.m. this evening. Scene 3 will be grilling hot dogs at the shop, after which a downtown group skate will commence. They’ll end at Rotary Centennial Riverfront Skatepark. For more info, click  here  or call (434) 385-4431.

Believe it or not, there’s one day a year set aside just for skateboarding. While the “holiday” hasn’t quite yet made it to federal day-off-work status, Scene 3 (1107 Main St.) is getting the local skate community together for a group skate from 6-9 p.m. this evening. Scene 3 will be grilling hot dogs at the shop, after which a downtown group skate will commence. They’ll end at Rotary Centennial Riverfront Skatepark. For more info, click here or call (434) 385-4431.

 While retooling Shakespeare isn’t always the best idea, it’s hard to fault Wolfbane Productions for the liberties they’ve taken with their encore production of  Romeo & Juliet . The Appomattox-based troupe have access to a national landmark – Appomattox Court House National Park (111 National Park Dr.) – that embodies the essence of feuding families and tragic star crossings, so they’ve moved the tale of the Capulets and the Montagues into the Civil War era. Performances run through June 30 on Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays at 8 p.m. The park opens to visitors two hours prior to performances. Plastic folding chairs are available on a first-come, first-serve basis, and you can also bring your own lawn/camp chair. General admission tickets are $25, with students, seniors, and military receiving a $5 discount; the $35 premium seating tickets include a chair. Click  here  for tickets and info, or call (434) 579-3542. You can turn the evening into a dinner date by making reservations at the Babcock House by clicking  here .

While retooling Shakespeare isn’t always the best idea, it’s hard to fault Wolfbane Productions for the liberties they’ve taken with their encore production of Romeo & Juliet. The Appomattox-based troupe have access to a national landmark – Appomattox Court House National Park (111 National Park Dr.) – that embodies the essence of feuding families and tragic star crossings, so they’ve moved the tale of the Capulets and the Montagues into the Civil War era. Performances run through June 30 on Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays at 8 p.m. The park opens to visitors two hours prior to performances. Plastic folding chairs are available on a first-come, first-serve basis, and you can also bring your own lawn/camp chair. General admission tickets are $25, with students, seniors, and military receiving a $5 discount; the $35 premium seating tickets include a chair. Click here for tickets and info, or call (434) 579-3542. You can turn the evening into a dinner date by making reservations at the Babcock House by clicking here.

 It takes a certain kind of person to consider running a fun hobby. We don’t have any of those types on staff at LynchburgDoes, but, hey, you might be one of them, and more power to you. The Lynchburg Road Runners usually meet for their weekly jaunt on Tuesdays each week at 6 p.m. and un for about five miles, but they’ve moved to Thursdays for June to accommodate the Tuesday Summer Track Series at Lynchburg College. Meet up with them tonight at Riverside Runners (2480 Rivermont Ave.). For more info, click  here  or call (434) 846-7449.

It takes a certain kind of person to consider running a fun hobby. We don’t have any of those types on staff at LynchburgDoes, but, hey, you might be one of them, and more power to you. The Lynchburg Road Runners usually meet for their weekly jaunt on Tuesdays each week at 6 p.m. and un for about five miles, but they’ve moved to Thursdays for June to accommodate the Tuesday Summer Track Series at Lynchburg College. Meet up with them tonight at Riverside Runners (2480 Rivermont Ave.). For more info, click here or call (434) 846-7449.

 The abbreviation in front of Rev. Run’s name isn’t just a title. Joseph Simmons, a founding member of Run-DMC, is actually an ordained pentecostal minister. But it’s safe to expect a sermon in hip hop rather than the gospel tonight as Rev. Run and DJ Ruckus kick off the first week of Cheers Lynchburg! at Riverfront Park (1100 Jefferson St.). The event is scheduled every Friday evening starting tonight through the second week in August when Billy Bob Thornton & the Boxmasters come to town to finish up the series. The show starts tonight at 7 p.m. Gates open at 6:30 p.m. General admission  tickets  are available for $10. For more info, click  here  or call (434) 535-6190.

The abbreviation in front of Rev. Run’s name isn’t just a title. Joseph Simmons, a founding member of Run-DMC, is actually an ordained pentecostal minister. But it’s safe to expect a sermon in hip hop rather than the gospel tonight as Rev. Run and DJ Ruckus kick off the first week of Cheers Lynchburg! at Riverfront Park (1100 Jefferson St.). The event is scheduled every Friday evening starting tonight through the second week in August when Billy Bob Thornton & the Boxmasters come to town to finish up the series. The show starts tonight at 7 p.m. Gates open at 6:30 p.m. General admission tickets are available for $10. For more info, click here or call (434) 535-6190.

 Hill City Swing (901 Jefferson St.) is doing their best to get Lynchburg dancing, which includes the Summer Swing Series that started a couple weeks ago. The two classes tonight are split between couples only and all-comers. The couples-only  class  from 7-8:30 p.m. is $30 per pair. The all-comers  class , from 8:30-9:30 p.m., will feature intermediate skills building off the first class in the series, but Hill City Swing says they can catch you up to speed if you missed the first. Social dancing is from 9:30-10:45 p.m. For more info about Hill City Swing, click  here  or call (540) 769-7192.

Hill City Swing (901 Jefferson St.) is doing their best to get Lynchburg dancing, which includes the Summer Swing Series that started a couple weeks ago. The two classes tonight are split between couples only and all-comers. The couples-only class from 7-8:30 p.m. is $30 per pair. The all-comers class, from 8:30-9:30 p.m., will feature intermediate skills building off the first class in the series, but Hill City Swing says they can catch you up to speed if you missed the first. Social dancing is from 9:30-10:45 p.m. For more info about Hill City Swing, click here or call (540) 769-7192.

 In Ireland they mark the summer solstice by celebrating a Day of Private Reflection. It is, after all, the longest day of the year if you’re counting hours of sunlight. Of course, if you’re a nocturnal creature, then it’s the shortest day of the year. But that’s beside the point. In these parts, we celebrate the solstice of summer in a number of ways, including a wine festival that was initiated ten years ago at Lazy Days Winery (1351 Amherst Hwy.). This year’s fest takes place two days after the actual solstice from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. today. It’ll features two stages for music performances by local acts like Apple Butter Soul, Bo-Zac, and GypsyTown. There will also be food, crafts, belly dancers, and a petting zoo, as well as lots and lots of local wine from Lazy Days Winery, Peaks of Otter Winery, Rebec Vineyards, Castle Glen Estates Winery, DelFosse Vineyards, DeVault Vineyards, Mountain Cove Vineyards, and Hill Top Berry Farm and Winery. Tasting tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the gate, and admission is free for kids 12 and under. Click  here  for tickets and more info, or call Lazy Days at (434)381-6088.

In Ireland they mark the summer solstice by celebrating a Day of Private Reflection. It is, after all, the longest day of the year if you’re counting hours of sunlight. Of course, if you’re a nocturnal creature, then it’s the shortest day of the year. But that’s beside the point. In these parts, we celebrate the solstice of summer in a number of ways, including a wine festival that was initiated ten years ago at Lazy Days Winery (1351 Amherst Hwy.). This year’s fest takes place two days after the actual solstice from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. today. It’ll features two stages for music performances by local acts like Apple Butter Soul, Bo-Zac, and GypsyTown. There will also be food, crafts, belly dancers, and a petting zoo, as well as lots and lots of local wine from Lazy Days Winery, Peaks of Otter Winery, Rebec Vineyards, Castle Glen Estates Winery, DelFosse Vineyards, DeVault Vineyards, Mountain Cove Vineyards, and Hill Top Berry Farm and Winery. Tasting tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the gate, and admission is free for kids 12 and under. Click here for tickets and more info, or call Lazy Days at (434)381-6088.

 Before Lockn’s jam bands send sound waves across Nelson County’s Blue Ridge skyline in August, consider a little research into the genre to see if the event might be worth a country drive and the ticket price. (More info about Lockn’ on our Future  page .) Every Saturday morning from 9 a.m. to noon, WNRN features the  The Grateful Dead and Phriends , a radio show that plays the Dead’s best live performances and talks about the band that helped pioneer the modern music festival. Or check out the sort of artists the Dead and friends have inspired throughout the years, such as the Kind who will perform tonight at The Stoney Badger (3009 Old Forest Rd.). The Blacksburg-based group defines their style as “hillbilly psychedelic folk rock,” and say their  setlist  is a sort of “melting pot” of Grateful Dead covers. Admission is $5 at the door. For more info, click  here  or call (434) 384-3004.

Before Lockn’s jam bands send sound waves across Nelson County’s Blue Ridge skyline in August, consider a little research into the genre to see if the event might be worth a country drive and the ticket price. (More info about Lockn’ on our Future page.) Every Saturday morning from 9 a.m. to noon, WNRN features the The Grateful Dead and Phriends, a radio show that plays the Dead’s best live performances and talks about the band that helped pioneer the modern music festival. Or check out the sort of artists the Dead and friends have inspired throughout the years, such as the Kind who will perform tonight at The Stoney Badger (3009 Old Forest Rd.). The Blacksburg-based group defines their style as “hillbilly psychedelic folk rock,” and say their setlist is a sort of “melting pot” of Grateful Dead covers. Admission is $5 at the door. For more info, click here or call (434) 384-3004.

 The mountain biking community is one group that tends to give back to the public resources they use. This afternoon, the Greater Lynchburg Off-Road Cyclists, or GLOC, are getting together to put in a morning’s labor on the city’s mountain biking trails at Peaks View Park (170 Ivy Creek Ln.). Maintenance includes cutting limbs, clearing brush, and mowing grass. They’ll go from 9 a.m. to noon when GLOC will provide pizza to volunteers. Bring work clothes, such as gloves, and any other trail maintenance tools, such as weed eaters and chainsaws. For more info, click  here  or email  ridewithgloc@gmail.com . Visit the group’s  website  for more info.

The mountain biking community is one group that tends to give back to the public resources they use. This afternoon, the Greater Lynchburg Off-Road Cyclists, or GLOC, are getting together to put in a morning’s labor on the city’s mountain biking trails at Peaks View Park (170 Ivy Creek Ln.). Maintenance includes cutting limbs, clearing brush, and mowing grass. They’ll go from 9 a.m. to noon when GLOC will provide pizza to volunteers. Bring work clothes, such as gloves, and any other trail maintenance tools, such as weed eaters and chainsaws. For more info, click here or email ridewithgloc@gmail.com. Visit the group’s website for more info.

 Each June the LGBTQ+ community hosts parades, parties, and memorials to mark Pride Month. Although the Hill City doesn’t yet have an annual Pride Parade, we do have Drag Disco. Tonight at Dish (1120 Main St.) the “Cool for the Summer” drag disco event features the performers Amazon Rome, Holly Whatt, Dreama Belle, Karma Skyy Dville, and Jack Valentine. The show starts at 8 p.m. and is a benefit for the Lynchburg Diversity Center, a non-profit community center for the LGBTQ+ community. Admission is $8 at the door. For more info about the event, click  here  or call (434) 528-0070.

Each June the LGBTQ+ community hosts parades, parties, and memorials to mark Pride Month. Although the Hill City doesn’t yet have an annual Pride Parade, we do have Drag Disco. Tonight at Dish (1120 Main St.) the “Cool for the Summer” drag disco event features the performers Amazon Rome, Holly Whatt, Dreama Belle, Karma Skyy Dville, and Jack Valentine. The show starts at 8 p.m. and is a benefit for the Lynchburg Diversity Center, a non-profit community center for the LGBTQ+ community. Admission is $8 at the door. For more info about the event, click here or call (434) 528-0070.

Publisher's Note

Thanks for landing at LynchburgDoes. For well over a year now we’ve been dedicated to the idea that there’s more happening in this little town of ours than many people suspect. We’re committed to demonstrating that on a weekly basis. Every Wednesday we publish a robust roster of informative, reliable, and often rather entertaining listings about music, theater, food, drink, and other local arts and cultural events. As we continue to discover new places to eat, drink, and be merry, we’ll keep letting you know. To those of you who have come to rely on LynchburgDoes as a resource, thank you. To those of you who are new to the site, welcome. If you’re so inclined, you can find us and like us on Facebook.

Matt Ashare
Editor and Publisher
LynchburgDoes.com

  The Wizard of Oz  (1939) wasn’t the first film to feature vibrant tones on the silver screen by way of technicolor, which was then an expensive and laborious process in the world of black-and-white cinema. But when a midwest tornado tears Dorothy (Judy Garland) away from her sepia-colored Kansas family and drops her into the bright world of Oz, the film industry and fantasy genre went along with her. When Dorothy and her dog Toto step out of their house — and over the wicked witch whom they just crushed — color and song and a whole lot of Munchkins greet her. And you know what happens: she and her newfound friends — a Scarecrow (Ray Bolger) in search of a brain, a Tin Man (Jack Haley) in search of a heart, and a Lion (Bert Lahr) in search of courage — take off down the yellow brick road to find the Wonderful Wizard of Oz in the Emerald City. The film, directed by Victor Fleming, is playing through Thursday at Venue Cinemas (901 Lakeside Dr.). For showtimes and more info, click  here  or call (434) 845-2398.

The Wizard of Oz (1939) wasn’t the first film to feature vibrant tones on the silver screen by way of technicolor, which was then an expensive and laborious process in the world of black-and-white cinema. But when a midwest tornado tears Dorothy (Judy Garland) away from her sepia-colored Kansas family and drops her into the bright world of Oz, the film industry and fantasy genre went along with her. When Dorothy and her dog Toto step out of their house — and over the wicked witch whom they just crushed — color and song and a whole lot of Munchkins greet her. And you know what happens: she and her newfound friends — a Scarecrow (Ray Bolger) in search of a brain, a Tin Man (Jack Haley) in search of a heart, and a Lion (Bert Lahr) in search of courage — take off down the yellow brick road to find the Wonderful Wizard of Oz in the Emerald City. The film, directed by Victor Fleming, is playing through Thursday at Venue Cinemas (901 Lakeside Dr.). For showtimes and more info, click here or call (434) 845-2398.

 We’re all thankful for the energy emanating from downtown Lynchburg, and we can do our part to keep it going. Along with frequenting its eateries, shops, and parks, we can help tidy up as well. The Downtown Lynchburg Association is looking for some volunteers to help keep our streets and play areas clean one block at a time. The Association will host a meeting tonight from 5:30-6:30 p.m. at Grassroots Local Market (1300 W. Main St.) for its Adopt-a-Block program, which will organize folks to pick up litter, pull weeds, and combat graffiti to keep Lynchburg looking great. For more info, click  here  or email  ashley@downtownlynchburg.com .

We’re all thankful for the energy emanating from downtown Lynchburg, and we can do our part to keep it going. Along with frequenting its eateries, shops, and parks, we can help tidy up as well. The Downtown Lynchburg Association is looking for some volunteers to help keep our streets and play areas clean one block at a time. The Association will host a meeting tonight from 5:30-6:30 p.m. at Grassroots Local Market (1300 W. Main St.) for its Adopt-a-Block program, which will organize folks to pick up litter, pull weeds, and combat graffiti to keep Lynchburg looking great. For more info, click here or email ashley@downtownlynchburg.com.

 No matter your age or skill level the Lynchburg Road Runners Summer Track Series has a race for you. It’s competitive, but fun, so it’s perfectly cool if you’re just trying to compete with yourself while hobnobbing with fellow runners. Tonight is the last in the series of “Fun for Everyone” track meets at Lynchburg College Track (1501 Lakeside Dr.). Tonight’s schedule inclues a one miler at 6:30p.m.); an open 200-meter run at 7 p.m.; age grouped 200-meter runs from 7:10 to 7:45 pm.; and an 800-meter  race at 7:45 p.m.. For more info, click  here  or call (434) 525-5136.

No matter your age or skill level the Lynchburg Road Runners Summer Track Series has a race for you. It’s competitive, but fun, so it’s perfectly cool if you’re just trying to compete with yourself while hobnobbing with fellow runners. Tonight is the last in the series of “Fun for Everyone” track meets at Lynchburg College Track (1501 Lakeside Dr.). Tonight’s schedule inclues a one miler at 6:30p.m.); an open 200-meter run at 7 p.m.; age grouped 200-meter runs from 7:10 to 7:45 pm.; and an 800-meter  race at 7:45 p.m.. For more info, click here or call (434) 525-5136.

 As defined by the Lynchburg Community Market (1219 Main St.), a locavore is someone whose food comes from within 100 miles of their home, which helps boost the local economy and cuts waste from the broader market. While going 100% locavore can be tricky, especially for those of us who don’t live on a farm, Green Market Wednesdays is one way to get closer to local-as-possible living. Unlike the Saturday market where growers can resell produce they purchase from large vendors, Green Market Wednesday has stricter rules about vendor-grown and raised, which means there are fewer options than the Saturday market. But there’s something special about making a meal concocted of ingredients produced by the person from whom you bought them and who might be able to provide you with some tips on how to prepare that produce. The market is open every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more info, click  here  or call (434) 455-4485.

As defined by the Lynchburg Community Market (1219 Main St.), a locavore is someone whose food comes from within 100 miles of their home, which helps boost the local economy and cuts waste from the broader market. While going 100% locavore can be tricky, especially for those of us who don’t live on a farm, Green Market Wednesdays is one way to get closer to local-as-possible living. Unlike the Saturday market where growers can resell produce they purchase from large vendors, Green Market Wednesday has stricter rules about vendor-grown and raised, which means there are fewer options than the Saturday market. But there’s something special about making a meal concocted of ingredients produced by the person from whom you bought them and who might be able to provide you with some tips on how to prepare that produce. The market is open every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more info, click here or call (434) 455-4485.