March 2018

 
 Happy Easter Sunday! We’re hoping that springtime is finally in the air or at least in the forecast. And, since very little is likely to be open today, with the exception of places of worship, we’re going to recommend heading out of the hills and into the mountains to commune with nature. There are leisurely and challenging hikes nearby at Peaks of Otter in Bedford County, Three Ridges and the Priest in Nelson County, and the aptly named Mount Pleasant in Amherst County. For more information about various mountain hikes, check out  HikingUpward.com , which provides time estimates, distances, directions, and level of difficulty for each trail.

Happy Easter Sunday! We’re hoping that springtime is finally in the air or at least in the forecast. And, since very little is likely to be open today, with the exception of places of worship, we’re going to recommend heading out of the hills and into the mountains to commune with nature. There are leisurely and challenging hikes nearby at Peaks of Otter in Bedford County, Three Ridges and the Priest in Nelson County, and the aptly named Mount Pleasant in Amherst County. For more information about various mountain hikes, check out HikingUpward.com, which provides time estimates, distances, directions, and level of difficulty for each trail.

 The late Charlton Heston had many prominent and provocative roles before he became a designated spokesman for the National Rifle Association. He played Andrew Jackson in the 1953 historical drama  The President’s Lady ; Marc Antony in both 1970’s  Julius Caesar  and 1972’s  Anthony and Cleopatra ; and   the titular Judah in the 1959 Biblical epic  Ben-Hur . But, with the possible exception of the tormented Astronaut Taylor in 1968’s  Planet of the Apes , his most memorably trenchant performance was as Moses in Cecil B. DeMille’s expansive  The Ten Commandments  (1956). An epically epic exercise in epicness, DeMille’s film pits Heston’s Moses again Yul Brynner’s King Rameses, and we know how that turned out. The film screens in all its glory this week at Venue Cinemas (901 Lakeside Dr.) at showtimes that have yet to be announced. Click  here  or call (434) 845-2398 for more info. It’s worth mentioning that Mel Brooks’ 1981 epic  History of the World: Part 1  had five more commandments than DeMille and Heston mustered for their epic.   

The late Charlton Heston had many prominent and provocative roles before he became a designated spokesman for the National Rifle Association. He played Andrew Jackson in the 1953 historical drama The President’s Lady; Marc Antony in both 1970’s Julius Caesar and 1972’s Anthony and Cleopatra; and the titular Judah in the 1959 Biblical epic Ben-Hur. But, with the possible exception of the tormented Astronaut Taylor in 1968’s Planet of the Apes, his most memorably trenchant performance was as Moses in Cecil B. DeMille’s expansive The Ten Commandments (1956). An epically epic exercise in epicness, DeMille’s film pits Heston’s Moses again Yul Brynner’s King Rameses, and we know how that turned out. The film screens in all its glory this week at Venue Cinemas (901 Lakeside Dr.) at showtimes that have yet to be announced. Click here or call (434) 845-2398 for more info. It’s worth mentioning that Mel Brooks’ 1981 epic History of the World: Part 1 had five more commandments than DeMille and Heston mustered for their epic.   

 With the evenings stretching out, this is the season to construct a regular pre-dusk workout routine. Every Tuesday the Lynchburg Road Runners meet at Riverside Runners (2480 Rivermont Ave.) to jaunt about 4 miles through the Rivermont area and its neighborhoods. The run begins at 6 p.m. and goes for about an hour. For more information, click  here  or call (434) 846-7449.

With the evenings stretching out, this is the season to construct a regular pre-dusk workout routine. Every Tuesday the Lynchburg Road Runners meet at Riverside Runners (2480 Rivermont Ave.) to jaunt about 4 miles through the Rivermont area and its neighborhoods. The run begins at 6 p.m. and goes for about an hour. For more information, click here or call (434) 846-7449.

 Back when he was at Rivermont Pizza, chef Shawn Merrow was usually behind the bar on taco Tuesdays. He’s brought the gourmet taco tradition over to his new digs at Grey’s (512 Fifth St.), where he’s now running the kitchen. From now until at least early August, Merrow will be cooking up tacos and putting together a special Latin American menu every Tuesday from 5 to 9 p.m. There will also be drink specials. It’s a good way to check out one of the best new eateries in town if you have not yet had the pleasure. Click  here  for more info, or call (434) 616-4939.

Back when he was at Rivermont Pizza, chef Shawn Merrow was usually behind the bar on taco Tuesdays. He’s brought the gourmet taco tradition over to his new digs at Grey’s (512 Fifth St.), where he’s now running the kitchen. From now until at least early August, Merrow will be cooking up tacos and putting together a special Latin American menu every Tuesday from 5 to 9 p.m. There will also be drink specials. It’s a good way to check out one of the best new eateries in town if you have not yet had the pleasure. Click here for more info, or call (434) 616-4939.

 We're going to extend an up-front “thank you” and a genuine LynchburgDoes tip of the hat to Tess Taylor for reminding us that a “chapbook” is a thing, and a cool thing at that. It’s basically a modest, pamphlet-sized collection of poetry, short fiction, and other literary musings, and Taylor’s  The Misremembered World  earned her the distinction of receiving the Poetry Society of America’s inaugural chapbook fellowship. She’s since published two poetry collections –  The Forage House  and  Work & Days  – both of which came out in 2016. It’s not clear from her  bio  where she currently resides, but we do know where she is right now because she’s this year’s Anne Spencer Poet-in-Residence at Randolph College. She reads from her work this evening at the school’s Maier Museum of Art (1 Quinlan St.) at 8 p.m. It’s a free event; call (434) 947-8136 for direction, or click  here .

We're going to extend an up-front “thank you” and a genuine LynchburgDoes tip of the hat to Tess Taylor for reminding us that a “chapbook” is a thing, and a cool thing at that. It’s basically a modest, pamphlet-sized collection of poetry, short fiction, and other literary musings, and Taylor’s The Misremembered World earned her the distinction of receiving the Poetry Society of America’s inaugural chapbook fellowship. She’s since published two poetry collections – The Forage House and Work & Days – both of which came out in 2016. It’s not clear from her bio where she currently resides, but we do know where she is right now because she’s this year’s Anne Spencer Poet-in-Residence at Randolph College. She reads from her work this evening at the school’s Maier Museum of Art (1 Quinlan St.) at 8 p.m. It’s a free event; call (434) 947-8136 for direction, or click here.

 There are precious few pop culture franchises with more generational crossover appeal than  Star Wars . Parents know Luke Skywalker as a young Padawan from the desert. Kids are familiar with the greyer, wiser, and grumpier Jedi. And, for reasons no one can quite figure out, everyone kinda loves Boba Fett. Lynchburg Public Library (2315 Memorial Ave.) celebrates  Star Wars  with a family program from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Children are encouraged to dress up as their favorite character while taking part in themed crafts and trivia games. For more information, click  here  or call (434) 455-6300.

There are precious few pop culture franchises with more generational crossover appeal than Star Wars. Parents know Luke Skywalker as a young Padawan from the desert. Kids are familiar with the greyer, wiser, and grumpier Jedi. And, for reasons no one can quite figure out, everyone kinda loves Boba Fett. Lynchburg Public Library (2315 Memorial Ave.) celebrates Star Wars with a family program from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Children are encouraged to dress up as their favorite character while taking part in themed crafts and trivia games. For more information, click here or call (434) 455-6300.

 With a little help from the attentive folks at  Bleacher Report , we’ve been enjoying the proliferation of amusing and inventive minor league baseball team names. There’s the Albuquerque Isotopes, the Iron Pigs of Lehigh Valley, Richmond’s Flying Squirrels, and, hailing from Kinston, NC, the Down East Wood Ducks. Assuming the weather holds, the Wood Ducks will waddle onto the diamond at City Stadium (3180 Fort Ave.) to take a quack at last season’s Carolina League champions, the Lynchburg Hillcats, this evening at 6:30 p.m. With 11 members returning from last year’s squad, the Hillcats may have a shot at another triumphant season. The park opens at 5 p.m. for this season’s opening showdown. Tickets start at $10. For more information, a season schedule, and ticketing, click  here  or call (434) 528-1144.

With a little help from the attentive folks at Bleacher Report, we’ve been enjoying the proliferation of amusing and inventive minor league baseball team names. There’s the Albuquerque Isotopes, the Iron Pigs of Lehigh Valley, Richmond’s Flying Squirrels, and, hailing from Kinston, NC, the Down East Wood Ducks. Assuming the weather holds, the Wood Ducks will waddle onto the diamond at City Stadium (3180 Fort Ave.) to take a quack at last season’s Carolina League champions, the Lynchburg Hillcats, this evening at 6:30 p.m. With 11 members returning from last year’s squad, the Hillcats may have a shot at another triumphant season. The park opens at 5 p.m. for this season’s opening showdown. Tickets start at $10. For more information, a season schedule, and ticketing, click here or call (434) 528-1144.

 Appomattox may be a small town, with fewer than 2,000 residents by the last census count, but it looms large in the country’s collective imagination, thanks to Appomattox Court House, the site of General Robert E. Lee’s surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia to US forces under the command of General Ulysses S. Grant on April 9, 1865. A lesser-known war story concerns Hannah Reynolds, just one of the estimated 660 casualties of the Battle of Appomattox Courthouse. She was a slave on the day she was wounded by an artillery shell, but she lived long enough – three days – to experience a fleeting glimpse of emancipation and freedom. Appomattox’s resident theater company,  Wolfbane Productions , presents an original one-act play devoted to the events surrounding Reynolds’ life and death this evening and tomorrow at 7 p.m. The free performances are held outdoors, so bring chairs and blankets. Click  here  or call (434) 579-3542 for more info. For more on events commemorating the 153rd anniversary of the battle that ended the Civil War, check out the National Parks Service  website .

Appomattox may be a small town, with fewer than 2,000 residents by the last census count, but it looms large in the country’s collective imagination, thanks to Appomattox Court House, the site of General Robert E. Lee’s surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia to US forces under the command of General Ulysses S. Grant on April 9, 1865. A lesser-known war story concerns Hannah Reynolds, just one of the estimated 660 casualties of the Battle of Appomattox Courthouse. She was a slave on the day she was wounded by an artillery shell, but she lived long enough – three days – to experience a fleeting glimpse of emancipation and freedom. Appomattox’s resident theater company, Wolfbane Productions, presents an original one-act play devoted to the events surrounding Reynolds’ life and death this evening and tomorrow at 7 p.m. The free performances are held outdoors, so bring chairs and blankets. Click here or call (434) 579-3542 for more info. For more on events commemorating the 153rd anniversary of the battle that ended the Civil War, check out the National Parks Service website.

 Mustering the motivation for a gym workout doesn’t sound nearly as inviting as a dance party. With this in mind, the Downtown YMCA (1513 Church Street) is pulling a good kind of fast one this evening by using its gym space for an hour-long, First Friday dance party starting at 6 p.m.    Get your heart rate and your spirits up by moving and grooving to some popular grooves. Members can bring a guest for free. Click  here  for more info or call (434) 847-5597.

Mustering the motivation for a gym workout doesn’t sound nearly as inviting as a dance party. With this in mind, the Downtown YMCA (1513 Church Street) is pulling a good kind of fast one this evening by using its gym space for an hour-long, First Friday dance party starting at 6 p.m.    Get your heart rate and your spirits up by moving and grooving to some popular grooves. Members can bring a guest for free. Click here for more info or call (434) 847-5597.

 There are a lot of good reasons to get downtown this evening for the first First Friday of spring, including a whole lotta art and some pretty decent music. The Academy Center of the Arts (600 Main St.) is featuring a juried exhibit of works by Lynchburg College, Randolph College, and Sweet Briar College students, as well as a national juried exhibit of works curated by Maier Museum Curator of Education Laura McManus. Lynchburg Museum (901 Court St.) has an exhibit of historical wedding gowns. And Riverviews Artspace (901 Jefferson St.) is the nexus of a bunch of stuff, including an opening reception for an exhibit of works by Cheryl Hawkins in the Co-op Gallery from 5 to 8 p.m., and two musical performances. Down the hall from the art reception, it’s original rock courtesy of A New Low, a local foursome featuring LD publisher Matt Ashare and LD web guru Jay Oliveira, from 6 to 8 p.m. Downstairs, in the Speakertree record shop, it’s art-rock from two bands, Jovian and TLVS, starting at 7 p.m. All events are free and open to the public. Click here for info on  Riverviews , and here for more on  First Fridays .   

There are a lot of good reasons to get downtown this evening for the first First Friday of spring, including a whole lotta art and some pretty decent music. The Academy Center of the Arts (600 Main St.) is featuring a juried exhibit of works by Lynchburg College, Randolph College, and Sweet Briar College students, as well as a national juried exhibit of works curated by Maier Museum Curator of Education Laura McManus. Lynchburg Museum (901 Court St.) has an exhibit of historical wedding gowns. And Riverviews Artspace (901 Jefferson St.) is the nexus of a bunch of stuff, including an opening reception for an exhibit of works by Cheryl Hawkins in the Co-op Gallery from 5 to 8 p.m., and two musical performances. Down the hall from the art reception, it’s original rock courtesy of A New Low, a local foursome featuring LD publisher Matt Ashare and LD web guru Jay Oliveira, from 6 to 8 p.m. Downstairs, in the Speakertree record shop, it’s art-rock from two bands, Jovian and TLVS, starting at 7 p.m. All events are free and open to the public. Click here for info on Riverviews, and here for more on First Fridays.   

 Most nights of the week, the Clubhouse (21174 Timberlake Road) is primarily a sports bar and billiards room, with nine pool tables, ten HD flat-screen TVs, and hot wings on the menu. But on weekends they tend to have music. Tonight they’re bringing in Rare Form, a pop-country cover band who will do their best to compete with the clattering of billiard balls. They should begin around 8 p.m. and play through midnight. There’s a $5 door charge; call (434) 239-7665 or click  here  for more info. 

Most nights of the week, the Clubhouse (21174 Timberlake Road) is primarily a sports bar and billiards room, with nine pool tables, ten HD flat-screen TVs, and hot wings on the menu. But on weekends they tend to have music. Tonight they’re bringing in Rare Form, a pop-country cover band who will do their best to compete with the clattering of billiard balls. They should begin around 8 p.m. and play through midnight. There’s a $5 door charge; call (434) 239-7665 or click here for more info. 

 Phase 2 (4009 Murray Pl.) will go unapologetically country this evening as the venue transforms itself into a refuge for all you urban cowboys and cowgirls. They’re going all the way on this one, by which we mean they are indeed bringing in a mechanical bull. There will be line dancing, as well as music by North Carolina country singer  Tim Elliott . Doors open at 7 p.m. and there’s a $5 cover. For more information, click  here  or call (434) 846-3206.

Phase 2 (4009 Murray Pl.) will go unapologetically country this evening as the venue transforms itself into a refuge for all you urban cowboys and cowgirls. They’re going all the way on this one, by which we mean they are indeed bringing in a mechanical bull. There will be line dancing, as well as music by North Carolina country singer Tim Elliott. Doors open at 7 p.m. and there’s a $5 cover. For more information, click here or call (434) 846-3206.

 Take it easy this Sunday morning. Just sit, relax, and let your consciousness go wherever it will. That’s the general attitude for the new weekly meditation group beginning today at  Good Karma Tea Co.  (174 Norfolk Ave.). The Tea Co. will host meditations guided by Paul Webb of  Compassionate Warrior Yoga  from 9-9:45 a.m. starting today and running for a least a couple of weeks He guides yoga and meditation classes in a variety of settings around Lynchburg, including at James River Yoga. For more information, click  here or call (434) 515-2058.

Take it easy this Sunday morning. Just sit, relax, and let your consciousness go wherever it will. That’s the general attitude for the new weekly meditation group beginning today at Good Karma Tea Co. (174 Norfolk Ave.). The Tea Co. will host meditations guided by Paul Webb of Compassionate Warrior Yoga from 9-9:45 a.m. starting today and running for a least a couple of weeks He guides yoga and meditation classes in a variety of settings around Lynchburg, including at James River Yoga. For more information, click hereor call (434) 515-2058.

 Having hoisted the Ten Commandments and led his people out of Egypt in good Passover fashion, the late Charlton Heston returns to the big screen at Venue Cinemas (901 Lakeside Dr.) in one of his more memorably tortured roles, as an astronaut who crash lands on a strangely familiar planet ruled by chimps, gorillas, and orangutans. Yep , it’s the original, pre-CGI  Planet of the Apes , which was based on a 1963 novel by French author Pierre Boulle. We don’t want to spoil the surprise ending, but it does turn out that Heston’s not quite as far from home as he thinks. Now 50 years old, the film screens at Venue Cinemas (901 Lakeside Dr.) with showtimes to be announced. For more information, click  here  or call (434) 845-2398.

Having hoisted the Ten Commandments and led his people out of Egypt in good Passover fashion, the late Charlton Heston returns to the big screen at Venue Cinemas (901 Lakeside Dr.) in one of his more memorably tortured roles, as an astronaut who crash lands on a strangely familiar planet ruled by chimps, gorillas, and orangutans. Yep,it’s the original, pre-CGI Planet of the Apes, which was based on a 1963 novel by French author Pierre Boulle. We don’t want to spoil the surprise ending, but it does turn out that Heston’s not quite as far from home as he thinks. Now 50 years old, the film screens at Venue Cinemas (901 Lakeside Dr.) with showtimes to be announced. For more information, click here or call (434) 845-2398.

 Just to clarify, the Bush coming to Phase 2 (4009 Murray Pl.) tonight is not a former president, an American lager, or any kind of shrubbery. It’s the British alt-rock band who were once beloved and despised for doing a spot-on impression of Nirvana-style agro-grunge whilst simultaneously making the transgressive seem oddly palatable. That was basically the story of the 1990s and hits like “Glycerine,” “The Chemicals Between Us,” and “Comedown.” The Bush boys are back together and they’re out supporting their seventh studio release,  Black and White Rainbows . Yes, Gavin Rossdale is still the frontman. They’re joined by Australia’s Atlas Genius and Atlanta’s Big Jesus for a big rock show starting tonight at 8 p.m., with doors at 7. General admission tickets are $45. For more info, click  here  or call (434) 846-3206.

Just to clarify, the Bush coming to Phase 2 (4009 Murray Pl.) tonight is not a former president, an American lager, or any kind of shrubbery. It’s the British alt-rock band who were once beloved and despised for doing a spot-on impression of Nirvana-style agro-grunge whilst simultaneously making the transgressive seem oddly palatable. That was basically the story of the 1990s and hits like “Glycerine,” “The Chemicals Between Us,” and “Comedown.” The Bush boys are back together and they’re out supporting their seventh studio release, Black and White Rainbows. Yes, Gavin Rossdale is still the frontman. They’re joined by Australia’s Atlas Genius and Atlanta’s Big Jesus for a big rock show starting tonight at 8 p.m., with doors at 7. General admission tickets are $45. For more info, click here or call (434) 846-3206.

 Here’s an idea: buy your favorite waitperson, bartender, and/or kitchen staffer a drink or two this evening at Fifth & Federal Station (801 Fifth St.). We can’t guarantee that they’ll all be there (somebody’s gotta work), but Tuesday is service industry night at Fifth & Federal, which means the establishment will be extending professional courtesy to anyone who serves food and beverages on other nights of the week. From 3 p.m. until close (around 11 p.m.), it’s 10% off entrees and 20% off apps for qualifying patrons. We’re told that the playing of Joking Hazard and Cards Against Humanity will be encouraged. Click  here  to see a menu and call (434) 386-8113 for more info.

Here’s an idea: buy your favorite waitperson, bartender, and/or kitchen staffer a drink or two this evening at Fifth & Federal Station (801 Fifth St.). We can’t guarantee that they’ll all be there (somebody’s gotta work), but Tuesday is service industry night at Fifth & Federal, which means the establishment will be extending professional courtesy to anyone who serves food and beverages on other nights of the week. From 3 p.m. until close (around 11 p.m.), it’s 10% off entrees and 20% off apps for qualifying patrons. We’re told that the playing of Joking Hazard and Cards Against Humanity will be encouraged. Click here to see a menu and call (434) 386-8113 for more info.

 One of the many hacks to being a successful baseball fan in Lynchburg is Winning Wednesday. Here’s how it works: Buy a ticket to tonight’s Hillcats home game at City Stadium (3180 Fort Ave.) for $10 and receive a free ticket to next Wednesday’s game. Use that ticket at the next Wednesday home game, and get a free ticket to the following Wednesday’s home game. We’re not great at math, but we’re pretty sure that’s a lot of tickets for just ten bucks. This evening the Hillcats go up against the Buies Creek Astros at 6:30 p.m. Next Wednesday they’re home for a matchup with the Frederick Keys. And on the 25th they play the Winston-Salem Dash at home. For a season schedule, click  here  or call (434) 528-1144 for more information.

One of the many hacks to being a successful baseball fan in Lynchburg is Winning Wednesday. Here’s how it works: Buy a ticket to tonight’s Hillcats home game at City Stadium (3180 Fort Ave.) for $10 and receive a free ticket to next Wednesday’s game. Use that ticket at the next Wednesday home game, and get a free ticket to the following Wednesday’s home game. We’re not great at math, but we’re pretty sure that’s a lot of tickets for just ten bucks. This evening the Hillcats go up against the Buies Creek Astros at 6:30 p.m. Next Wednesday they’re home for a matchup with the Frederick Keys. And on the 25th they play the Winston-Salem Dash at home. For a season schedule, click here or call (434) 528-1144 for more information.

 A diligent musician in Lynchburg can usually find an open mic somewhere if they feel the need to unburden their beats or release some rhythm. Tonight, the singer searching for a stage or the patron hoping for a performance can check out Jodie’s Open Mic, hosted by Jodie Davis at Charley’s Restaurant (707 Graves Mill Rd.). The open mic is held every Wednesday from 7-10 p.m. For more information, click  here  or call (434) 237-5988.

A diligent musician in Lynchburg can usually find an open mic somewhere if they feel the need to unburden their beats or release some rhythm. Tonight, the singer searching for a stage or the patron hoping for a performance can check out Jodie’s Open Mic, hosted by Jodie Davis at Charley’s Restaurant (707 Graves Mill Rd.). The open mic is held every Wednesday from 7-10 p.m. For more information, click here or call (434) 237-5988.

 Cool generally pals around with a gang that includes groovy, sweet, and jolly good, but we don’t often see the word used as a noun. Any language worth speaking is a living one, so it’s no surprise that the local performing arts group The Listening is taking a little poetic license and bringing on “The Cool” this evening at the Academy Center of the Arts (519 Commerce St.) tonight at 7 p.m. Basically, it’s an open mic for wordsmiths and other creative types who have something to say. For more information, click  here .

Cool generally pals around with a gang that includes groovy, sweet, and jolly good, but we don’t often see the word used as a noun. Any language worth speaking is a living one, so it’s no surprise that the local performing arts group The Listening is taking a little poetic license and bringing on “The Cool” this evening at the Academy Center of the Arts (519 Commerce St.) tonight at 7 p.m. Basically, it’s an open mic for wordsmiths and other creative types who have something to say. For more information, click here.

 Ryan Crane’s a Lynchburg native who’s adept at abstract art and electronic dance music. His latest project, “Vibes,” combines the two in ways that sound rather intriguing. He’s setting up his pop-up, pop-art exhibit at Riverviews Artspace (901 Jefferson Street) this evening for a show that will feature bass-driven deep house music by DJs JXN and Tony Day. The music and art shindig kicks off at 6 and goes until 10 p.m. It’s part of Riverviews’ Emerging Artist Series. Click  here  for more info or call (434) 847-7277.

Ryan Crane’s a Lynchburg native who’s adept at abstract art and electronic dance music. His latest project, “Vibes,” combines the two in ways that sound rather intriguing. He’s setting up his pop-up, pop-art exhibit at Riverviews Artspace (901 Jefferson Street) this evening for a show that will feature bass-driven deep house music by DJs JXN and Tony Day. The music and art shindig kicks off at 6 and goes until 10 p.m. It’s part of Riverviews’ Emerging Artist Series. Click here for more info or call (434) 847-7277.

 If you’re a podcast devotee or a fan of public radio, then you’ve probably come across Brian Reed in one form or another. He’s a senior producer for  This American Life , and in 2017 he had a major podcasting hit with the seven-part investigative series  S-Town . By the way, if you’re not familiar with podcasting, think of it as the radio equivalent of Netflix – a deep rabbit hole of streamable radio shows of all types.  S-Town , one of the more binge-worthy podcasts of the last year, digs deep into the story of an alleged murder in Woodstock, Alabama and into the life of one of the town’s more colorful characters, a horologist named John B. McLemore. Reed is coming to Lynchburg this evening to talk about his craft at the Academy Center of the Arts (519 Commerce St.) at 7:30 p.m. Tickets run from $18 to $35 and can be purchased  here . Call (434) 846-8499 for more info.

If you’re a podcast devotee or a fan of public radio, then you’ve probably come across Brian Reed in one form or another. He’s a senior producer for This American Life, and in 2017 he had a major podcasting hit with the seven-part investigative series S-Town. By the way, if you’re not familiar with podcasting, think of it as the radio equivalent of Netflix – a deep rabbit hole of streamable radio shows of all types. S-Town, one of the more binge-worthy podcasts of the last year, digs deep into the story of an alleged murder in Woodstock, Alabama and into the life of one of the town’s more colorful characters, a horologist named John B. McLemore. Reed is coming to Lynchburg this evening to talk about his craft at the Academy Center of the Arts (519 Commerce St.) at 7:30 p.m. Tickets run from $18 to $35 and can be purchased here. Call (434) 846-8499 for more info.

 The Amazement Square Holiday Market sold out back in November, so make a game plan and show up early to the Hill City Handmade Spring Market. The crafts and wares go on sale at 9 a.m. for early-bird ticket holders ($10) at the Amazement Square Education Center (27 9th Street), which has both indoor and outdoor space for vendors and food trucks. For a full list of “makers,” including crafters of knits, jewelry, pottery, and body and skincare emollients, click  here . The general public will be allowed in at 11 .m. for an entry fee of $3. Call (434) 845-1888 for more info.

The Amazement Square Holiday Market sold out back in November, so make a game plan and show up early to the Hill City Handmade Spring Market. The crafts and wares go on sale at 9 a.m. for early-bird ticket holders ($10) at the Amazement Square Education Center (27 9th Street), which has both indoor and outdoor space for vendors and food trucks. For a full list of “makers,” including crafters of knits, jewelry, pottery, and body and skincare emollients, click here. The general public will be allowed in at 11 .m. for an entry fee of $3. Call (434) 845-1888 for more info.

 When we think of seafood, there’s one place in Virginia that immediately comes to mind: Appomattox. Okay, maybe it’s not the first place that comes to mind. But Appomattox is home to an annual Oyster & Seafood Festival that features James River oysters, Maryland-style crab cakes, and shrimp po boys, as well as a selection of craft brews, regional distilled beverages, and local wines. The event, hosted by the Appomattox Historical Society at Clover Hill Village Living History Center (5747 River Ridge Rd.), runs from noon until 6 p.m. Tickets are $15 in advance or $25 at the gate. For more info, click  here .

When we think of seafood, there’s one place in Virginia that immediately comes to mind: Appomattox. Okay, maybe it’s not the first place that comes to mind. But Appomattox is home to an annual Oyster & Seafood Festival that features James River oysters, Maryland-style crab cakes, and shrimp po boys, as well as a selection of craft brews, regional distilled beverages, and local wines. The event, hosted by the Appomattox Historical Society at Clover Hill Village Living History Center (5747 River Ridge Rd.), runs from noon until 6 p.m. Tickets are $15 in advance or $25 at the gate. For more info, click here.

 Thomas Jefferson was a man of his time, which can be taken a lot of different ways. He was also an innovator and a tinkerer. So, when he found it difficult to grow barley at his main basecamp Monticello, he substituted corn in what is rumored to have been a rather hoppy pale ale. You can find a recipe for  Thomas Jefferson Plug Nickel Ale  on the American Homebrewers Association website, and you can enjoy a fine selection of contemporary Virginia beer today at the third president’s Bedford County retreat, Poplar Forest (1542 Bateman Bridge Rd). The ales, ciders, stouts, and porters will be flowing from 11 a.m. until 5 p.m. Tickets to the annual event are $30 for 20 tastings and $10 for designated drivers. VIP tickets are also available. Participants include Blue Mountain Brewery, Devil’s Backbone Brewing Company, South Street Brewery, and Bold Rock Hard Cider. For more information, click  here  or call (434) 525-1806.

Thomas Jefferson was a man of his time, which can be taken a lot of different ways. He was also an innovator and a tinkerer. So, when he found it difficult to grow barley at his main basecamp Monticello, he substituted corn in what is rumored to have been a rather hoppy pale ale. You can find a recipe for Thomas Jefferson Plug Nickel Ale on the American Homebrewers Association website, and you can enjoy a fine selection of contemporary Virginia beer today at the third president’s Bedford County retreat, Poplar Forest (1542 Bateman Bridge Rd). The ales, ciders, stouts, and porters will be flowing from 11 a.m. until 5 p.m. Tickets to the annual event are $30 for 20 tastings and $10 for designated drivers. VIP tickets are also available. Participants include Blue Mountain Brewery, Devil’s Backbone Brewing Company, South Street Brewery, and Bold Rock Hard Cider. For more information, click here or call (434) 525-1806.

 It’s a big night for hip-hop nostalgia at Phase 2 (4009 Murray Pl.) as the club goes old school with the original line-up of Bones Thugs-N-Harmony. For those who need reminding, that would be Layzie Bone, Krayzie Bone, Bizzy Bone, Wish Bone, and, of course, Flesh-n-Bone on stage together revisiting such hits as “Tha Crossroads” and maybe even “Thuggish Ruggish Bone.” The Cleveland-bred rap group released their first album in 1993 and their seventh,  New Wave , a little less than a year ago. General admission  tickets are $30. For more info, click  here  or call (434) 846-3206.

It’s a big night for hip-hop nostalgia at Phase 2 (4009 Murray Pl.) as the club goes old school with the original line-up of Bones Thugs-N-Harmony. For those who need reminding, that would be Layzie Bone, Krayzie Bone, Bizzy Bone, Wish Bone, and, of course, Flesh-n-Bone on stage together revisiting such hits as “Tha Crossroads” and maybe even “Thuggish Ruggish Bone.” The Cleveland-bred rap group released their first album in 1993 and their seventh, New Wave, a little less than a year ago. General admission ticketsare $30. For more info, click here or call (434) 846-3206.

 Located in a winsome little house just off of Rivermont Avenue, Good Karma Tea Co. (174 Norfolk Avenue) is a cool spot for hot cup of loose organic tea. It’s also home to Good Karma Mind and Body (174 Norfolk Avenue), a self-described “holistic healing studio” that offers a range of massage therapies and a place to chill out and de-stress. Today it’s a women’s only afternoon of “heart shares, intention setting, and meditation.” The April Women’s New Moon cycle runs from 4:30 to 7 p.m. and costs $15 to attend. Click  here  to register or call (434) 515-2058.

Located in a winsome little house just off of Rivermont Avenue, Good Karma Tea Co. (174 Norfolk Avenue) is a cool spot for hot cup of loose organic tea. It’s also home to Good Karma Mind and Body (174 Norfolk Avenue), a self-described “holistic healing studio” that offers a range of massage therapies and a place to chill out and de-stress. Today it’s a women’s only afternoon of “heart shares, intention setting, and meditation.” The April Women’s New Moon cycle runs from 4:30 to 7 p.m. and costs $15 to attend. Click here to register or call (434) 515-2058.

 At Graham Chapman’s funeral, his close friend and writing partner John Cleese began what seemed to be a solemn eulogy and, with expert satirical seriousness, insulted his former  Monty Python  pal. It was Chapman who took on the role of King Arthur in  Monty Python and the Holy Grail  (1968), a brilliant send-up of the round-table legend. In the film, Cleese is the Black Night who squares off in a swordfight with Chapman, stands by his side as Sir Lancelot, and taunts him as an ornery, cattle-tossing Frenchman. The film screens at Venue Cinemas (901 Lakeside Drive) through Friday, with showtimes to be announced. For tickets and more info, click  here  or (434) 845-2398.

At Graham Chapman’s funeral, his close friend and writing partner John Cleese began what seemed to be a solemn eulogy and, with expert satirical seriousness, insulted his former Monty Python pal. It was Chapman who took on the role of King Arthur in Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1968), a brilliant send-up of the round-table legend. In the film, Cleese is the Black Night who squares off in a swordfight with Chapman, stands by his side as Sir Lancelot, and taunts him as an ornery, cattle-tossing Frenchman. The film screens at Venue Cinemas (901 Lakeside Drive) through Friday, with showtimes to be announced. For tickets and more info, click here or (434) 845-2398.

 Larry Bassett may not be a household name, but he is semi-famous and just a little bit notorious in these parts, particularly with the IRS. As the story goes, Bassett refused to pay taxes for a pretty good reason: he did not appreciate his money going to support war efforts. An hour-long documentary about Bassett was shot inside the Riverviews building downtown.  Fittingly enough, it’s screening this evening at Riverviews Artspace (901 Jefferson Street) with an introduction by producer and director Alex Short. Short will also take questions after the screening. It’s free and it starts at 7 p.m. For more information, click  here  or by (434) 847-7277.

Larry Bassett may not be a household name, but he is semi-famous and just a little bit notorious in these parts, particularly with the IRS. As the story goes, Bassett refused to pay taxes for a pretty good reason: he did not appreciate his money going to support war efforts. An hour-long documentary about Bassett was shot inside the Riverviews building downtown.  Fittingly enough, it’s screening this evening at Riverviews Artspace (901 Jefferson Street) with an introduction by producer and director Alex Short. Short will also take questions after the screening. It’s free and it starts at 7 p.m. For more information, click here or by (434) 847-7277.

 A typical alien invasion generally involves spherical spaceships hovering over major cities and raining death and destruction down from the heavens. A subset of these invasions may include a mysterious creature or two wreaking havoc on the ground. But a subtler and in many way more unsettling kind of alien invader never shows itself. That’s the premise of  Invasion of the Body Snatchers , one of the great exercises in mind over metaphor. There are two official versions of the film, but only the 1978 remake by director Phillip Kaufman stars a youngish Donald Sutherland (he was in his forties at the time) and an actually young Jeff Goldblum (he was in his early twenties). It’s one of those rare cases where the second version is probably the better of the two. The positively creepy sci-fi flick screens this evening as part of the Underground Movie Club series at Riverviews Artspace (901 Jefferson Street). It starts at 7 p.m. and tickets are $7. Click  here  or call (434) 847-7277 for more info.

A typical alien invasion generally involves spherical spaceships hovering over major cities and raining death and destruction down from the heavens. A subset of these invasions may include a mysterious creature or two wreaking havoc on the ground. But a subtler and in many way more unsettling kind of alien invader never shows itself. That’s the premise of Invasion of the Body Snatchers, one of the great exercises in mind over metaphor. There are two official versions of the film, but only the 1978 remake by director Phillip Kaufman stars a youngish Donald Sutherland (he was in his forties at the time) and an actually young Jeff Goldblum (he was in his early twenties). It’s one of those rare cases where the second version is probably the better of the two. The positively creepy sci-fi flick screens this evening as part of the Underground Movie Club series at Riverviews Artspace (901 Jefferson Street). It starts at 7 p.m. and tickets are $7. Click here or call (434) 847-7277 for more info.

 Regardless of whether the weather finally settles into spring, the Academy Center of the Arts (600 Main St.) will shutter the Warehouse Concert Series for the season after tonight’s show in favor of its warmer weather venue at Riverfront Park. Tonight they’ll follow the Americana theme they’ve stuck to most of the winter when  Chatham County Line and  The Deer Creek Boys  perform. Chatham County line, which hails from North Carolina, dropped its most recent album  Autumn  in 2016. The Deer Creek Boys are from neighboring Amherst County where brothers Justin and Jason Tomlin first teamed up with friend Cason Ogden in 1999. The band later reformed and added Andy Lowe, a banjo picker from North Carolina. Doors open at 7 p.m. and music starts at 8 p.m. Tickets are $20 in advance or $25 at the door. For more information, click  here  or call (434) 846-8499.

Regardless of whether the weather finally settles into spring, the Academy Center of the Arts (600 Main St.) will shutter the Warehouse Concert Series for the season after tonight’s show in favor of its warmer weather venue at Riverfront Park. Tonight they’ll follow the Americana theme they’ve stuck to most of the winter when Chatham County Lineand The Deer Creek Boys perform. Chatham County line, which hails from North Carolina, dropped its most recent album Autumn in 2016. The Deer Creek Boys are from neighboring Amherst County where brothers Justin and Jason Tomlin first teamed up with friend Cason Ogden in 1999. The band later reformed and added Andy Lowe, a banjo picker from North Carolina. Doors open at 7 p.m. and music starts at 8 p.m. Tickets are $20 in advance or $25 at the door. For more information, click here or call (434) 846-8499.

 One of the many warm embraces between the hippie counterculture and sexual revolution yielded a phenomenon called  HAIR :  The American Tribal Love-Rock Musical . The irreverent play first debuted off-Broadway in 1967 and found cultural success that included some of its songs becoming anti-Vietnam war anthems. The Renaissance Theatre (1022 Commerce Street) is bringing the show to Hill City for eight shows starting tonight and Saturday. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. Ticket are $15 or $18 and can be found  here . For more info, call (434) 845-4427.

One of the many warm embraces between the hippie counterculture and sexual revolution yielded a phenomenon called HAIRThe American Tribal Love-Rock Musical. The irreverent play first debuted off-Broadway in 1967 and found cultural success that included some of its songs becoming anti-Vietnam war anthems. The Renaissance Theatre (1022 Commerce Street) is bringing the show to Hill City for eight shows starting tonight and Saturday. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. Ticket are $15 or $18 and can be found here. For more info, call (434) 845-4427.

 We must have missed Rex Manning Day, named the fictional pop icon’s visit to  Empire Records , which set off the plot of the 1995 film. But we would never pass by Record Store Day without a nod and likely not without breaking our entertainment budget. This year, Speakertree (901 Jefferson St.) has planned an all day event for the international festival celebrating independently owned music shops. Hoping to bring the biggest Record Store Day the Hill City has ever seen, Speakertree expects a special selection of limited edition and new releases that artists and vendors saved up for the event. Speakertree will be open from 9 a.m.-7 p.m. For more info, click  here  or call (434) 485-8262.

We must have missed Rex Manning Day, named the fictional pop icon’s visit to Empire Records, which set off the plot of the 1995 film. But we would never pass by Record Store Day without a nod and likely not without breaking our entertainment budget. This year, Speakertree (901 Jefferson St.) has planned an all day event for the international festival celebrating independently owned music shops. Hoping to bring the biggest Record Store Day the Hill City has ever seen, Speakertree expects a special selection of limited edition and new releases that artists and vendors saved up for the event. Speakertree will be open from 9 a.m.-7 p.m. For more info, click here or call (434) 485-8262.

 Lynchburg’s shapely geography lends itself to few sports better than mountain biking, which is why the Hill City hosts a relatively active off-road community. Along with regular group rides,  Greater Lynchburg Off-Road Cyclist Group  puts together a few larger rides and races, such as the third annual Ride Eat Ride today at Peaks View Park (1203 Ardmore Drive). The first ride will begin at 5 p.m., followed by food at 6 p.m. The second group ride starts after dinner. They’ll meet up at the Ardmore Entrance. This event is free and open to the public. More information can be found  here .

Lynchburg’s shapely geography lends itself to few sports better than mountain biking, which is why the Hill City hosts a relatively active off-road community. Along with regular group rides, Greater Lynchburg Off-Road Cyclist Group puts together a few larger rides and races, such as the third annual Ride Eat Ride today at Peaks View Park (1203 Ardmore Drive). The first ride will begin at 5 p.m., followed by food at 6 p.m. The second group ride starts after dinner. They’ll meet up at the Ardmore Entrance. This event is free and open to the public. More information can be found here.

 Marty Stuart hit the road at about 12 years old after joining up with the Sullivan Family Gospel Singers. But at 59, the country singer still tours like he has “a million miles to go,” which is not incidentally a line from a song on his latest  album  “Way Out West.” Along with performing with His Famous Superlatives, Stuart has enjoyed a sturdy career, which includes touring with Johnny Cash in the 80s and hitting the Top 10 with his first solo album  Hillbilly Rock . Stuart’s performance tonight kicks off this year’s Riverfront Park Concert Series (1100 Jefferson St.). Doors open at 5 p.m., and  The Secret Sisters , who hail from the legendary Muscle Shoals, Alabama, start playing at 7 p.m. General admission tickets are $11. For more info, including tickets, click  here  or call (434) 846-8499.

Marty Stuart hit the road at about 12 years old after joining up with the Sullivan Family Gospel Singers. But at 59, the country singer still tours like he has “a million miles to go,” which is not incidentally a line from a song on his latest album “Way Out West.” Along with performing with His Famous Superlatives, Stuart has enjoyed a sturdy career, which includes touring with Johnny Cash in the 80s and hitting the Top 10 with his first solo album Hillbilly Rock. Stuart’s performance tonight kicks off this year’s Riverfront Park Concert Series (1100 Jefferson St.). Doors open at 5 p.m., and The Secret Sisters, who hail from the legendary Muscle Shoals, Alabama, start playing at 7 p.m. General admission tickets are $11. For more info, including tickets, click here or call (434) 846-8499.

 Although the Lockn’ festival at Infinity Downs Farm (1500 Diggs Mountain Rd., Arrington), draws jam-band titans to headline like Widespread Panic and members of the Grateful Dead, the August festival in Nelson County sets aside a spot for the commonwealth’s finest. Today at Infinity Downs, six Virginia acts, including Firecracker Jam from here in Lynchburg, will square off in the Rockn’ to Lockn’ Finale to fill that slot on stage. The all-day mini-festival and competition starts at 1 p.m. and goes through midnight. Music starts at 3:30 p.m. General admission tickets are $10, although additional packages, including camping sites are available. For more information, including tickets, click  here  or email  info@locknfestival.com .

Although the Lockn’ festival at Infinity Downs Farm (1500 Diggs Mountain Rd., Arrington), draws jam-band titans to headline like Widespread Panic and members of the Grateful Dead, the August festival in Nelson County sets aside a spot for the commonwealth’s finest. Today at Infinity Downs, six Virginia acts, including Firecracker Jam from here in Lynchburg, will square off in the Rockn’ to Lockn’ Finale to fill that slot on stage. The all-day mini-festival and competition starts at 1 p.m. and goes through midnight. Music starts at 3:30 p.m. General admission tickets are $10, although additional packages, including camping sites are available. For more information, including tickets, click here or email info@locknfestival.com.

 Music can’t stop Monday from coming, but it can take your mind off the impending work week for an evening. With that in mind, consider making way to The White Hart Café (1208 Main Street) for the gentle sounds of Nashville native Jordy Searcy playing alongside Cole Loomis. Searcy is hailed as a captivating live artist that loops vocals through the soundhole of his guitar. He also plays unplugged and barefoot. The show starts at 7 p.m., and more information can be found  here .

Music can’t stop Monday from coming, but it can take your mind off the impending work week for an evening. With that in mind, consider making way to The White Hart Café (1208 Main Street) for the gentle sounds of Nashville native Jordy Searcy playing alongside Cole Loomis. Searcy is hailed as a captivating live artist that loops vocals through the soundhole of his guitar. He also plays unplugged and barefoot. The show starts at 7 p.m., and more information can be found here.

 Human Libraries began as a way to challenge stereotypes through one-on-one, 15 minute open dialogues. As they host one tonight, community members at Lynchburg College (1501 Lakeside Drive) will address several different topics, including sexuality and mental health in order to help people understand each other. The event will be held at 3 p.m. on Monday and Tuesday. More information can be found  here .

Human Libraries began as a way to challenge stereotypes through one-on-one, 15 minute open dialogues. As they host one tonight, community members at Lynchburg College (1501 Lakeside Drive) will address several different topics, including sexuality and mental health in order to help people understand each other. The event will be held at 3 p.m. on Monday and Tuesday. More information can be found here.

 Although Anne Spencer was best known as a Harlem Renaissance poet, Civil Rights activist, and educator, she kept gardening as a hobby. So for Historic Garden Week, The Anne Spencer House & Garden Museum (1313 Pierce Street) will open the garden, cottage, and first floor of the museum for anyone with  Historic Garden Week  tickets. There will be a $5 admission for self-guided tours for those without tickets. Poets and authors will also be at the event while exploring these historic gardens. For more information, click  here  or call (434) 845-1313.

Although Anne Spencer was best known as a Harlem Renaissance poet, Civil Rights activist, and educator, she kept gardening as a hobby. So for Historic Garden Week, The Anne Spencer House & Garden Museum (1313 Pierce Street) will open the garden, cottage, and first floor of the museum for anyone with Historic Garden Week tickets. There will be a $5 admission for self-guided tours for those without tickets. Poets and authors will also be at the event while exploring these historic gardens. For more information, click here or call (434) 845-1313.

 As a poet, author, and artist, Jasmine Mans personifies the ideals  The Listening  laid out at its inception making her a fitting voice to perform at its Signature Session tonight. Mans published her first book  Chalk Outlines of Snow Angels  in 2012, the same year Glamour Magazine named her among the Top 10 Most Influential Women in College. She’s a social critic whose name and poetry rung out through the web with titles, such as “Nicki Minaj,” “This Work,” and “Dear Ex Lover.” She’ll perform tonight from 7-9 p.m. at The Glass House (1019 Jefferson St.) along with a handful of local artists, including jazz group Canvass Collective. Tickets are  $15.  For more information, click  here .

As a poet, author, and artist, Jasmine Mans personifies the ideals The Listening laid out at its inception making her a fitting voice to perform at its Signature Session tonight. Mans published her first book Chalk Outlines of Snow Angels in 2012, the same year Glamour Magazine named her among the Top 10 Most Influential Women in College. She’s a social critic whose name and poetry rung out through the web with titles, such as “Nicki Minaj,” “This Work,” and “Dear Ex Lover.” She’ll perform tonight from 7-9 p.m. at The Glass House (1019 Jefferson St.) along with a handful of local artists, including jazz group Canvass Collective. Tickets are  $15.  For more information, click here.

 The name Jim Henson likely evokes images of a little green guy named Kermit a very large yet personable yellow bird, and a porcine diva. But Henson’s creative vision extended beyond the alleyways of  Sesame Street  and the theatrics of  The Muppet Show . In  The Dark Crystal (1982), which he co-directed with Frank Oz, the warm and fuzzy puppetry typically associated with Henson morphs into something darker and stranger. You’ve got the vulture-like visage of the Skeksis, who have mercilessly ruled the planet Thra for a thousand years, and the more peaceable Mystics, a race of wizards who may just be able to wrest power from the evil overlords with a little help from an elfin Gelfing named Jen. It all hinges on the power contained within the film’s titular crystal. The film screens today and tomorrow at Venue Cinemas (901 Lakeside Dr.) at noon, 2:15, 4:30, 7, and 9:15 p.m. For ticketing and info, click  here  or call (434) 845-2398.

The name Jim Henson likely evokes images of a little green guy named Kermit a very large yet personable yellow bird, and a porcine diva. But Henson’s creative vision extended beyond the alleyways of Sesame Street and the theatrics of The Muppet Show. In The Dark Crystal(1982), which he co-directed with Frank Oz, the warm and fuzzy puppetry typically associated with Henson morphs into something darker and stranger. You’ve got the vulture-like visage of the Skeksis, who have mercilessly ruled the planet Thra for a thousand years, and the more peaceable Mystics, a race of wizards who may just be able to wrest power from the evil overlords with a little help from an elfin Gelfing named Jen. It all hinges on the power contained within the film’s titular crystal. The film screens today and tomorrow at Venue Cinemas (901 Lakeside Dr.) at noon, 2:15, 4:30, 7, and 9:15 p.m. For ticketing and info, click here or call (434) 845-2398.

 Some folks in the Hill City are working hard to craft the perfect cocktail, and tonight they’ll show off their best concoctions as the Academy Center of the Arts (600 Main St.) hosts The Top Mixologist competition. Bartenders from Jimmy’s on the James, Avenue Foods, {RA} Bistro, and the Water Dog are signed up to compete for the top honors from 6-9 p.m. The theme is “Drink Well, Speak Easy,” a reference to the days when the hills outside of Lynchburg were dotted with stills ginning up illegal booze. Tickets are $38 and include hors d'oeuvres and a drink from each bartender. For tickets and info, click  here  or call (434) 846-8499.

Some folks in the Hill City are working hard to craft the perfect cocktail, and tonight they’ll show off their best concoctions as the Academy Center of the Arts (600 Main St.) hosts The Top Mixologist competition. Bartenders from Jimmy’s on the James, Avenue Foods, {RA} Bistro, and the Water Dog are signed up to compete for the top honors from 6-9 p.m. The theme is “Drink Well, Speak Easy,” a reference to the days when the hills outside of Lynchburg were dotted with stills ginning up illegal booze. Tickets are $38 and include hors d'oeuvres and a drink from each bartender. For tickets and info, click here or call (434) 846-8499.

 The White Hart Café (1208 Main St.) offers up some original music in addition to the regular menu this evening from 7 to 9 p.m. Orion and the Melted Crayons features Charlottesville-based singer-songwriter Orion Faruque and a band of multi-instrumentalists who specialize in simple melodies and sunny lyrics, which sounds about right for a coffeehouse-type show. Call the White Hart at  (434) 207-5600 or click  here  for more info.

The White Hart Café (1208 Main St.) offers up some original music in addition to the regular menu this evening from 7 to 9 p.m. Orion and the Melted Crayons features Charlottesville-based singer-songwriter Orion Faruque and a band of multi-instrumentalists who specialize in simple melodies and sunny lyrics, which sounds about right for a coffeehouse-type show. Call the White Hart at  (434) 207-5600 or click here for more info.

 Feel free to paint the town or at least a small corner of it red, and blue, and yellow, and green,  and maybe even  fuchsia tonight at Phase 2 (4009 Murray Pl.), where they’re hosting a bona fide Paint Party. The event is billed as “The Largest Paint Party in Lynchburg History,” which means they’ll disperse more than 300 gallons of paint paired with confetti explosions. We recommend a white shirt that you never want to wear again but that could serve as a souvenir of a night to remember even if you forget it.  Breathe Carolina , an internationally touring EDM act out of Denver, will headline. General admission tickets are $10 and VIP options are available. For more information, click  here  or call (434) 846-3206.

Feel free to paint the town or at least a small corner of it red, and blue, and yellow, and green,  and maybe even  fuchsia tonight at Phase 2 (4009 Murray Pl.), where they’re hosting a bona fide Paint Party. The event is billed as “The Largest Paint Party in Lynchburg History,” which means they’ll disperse more than 300 gallons of paint paired with confetti explosions. We recommend a white shirt that you never want to wear again but that could serve as a souvenir of a night to remember even if you forget it. Breathe Carolina, an internationally touring EDM act out of Denver, will headline. General admission tickets are $10 and VIP options are available. For more information, click here or call (434) 846-3206.

 Stormwater runoff isn’t the most publicized environmental threat, so the James River Association and Art on Wheels are aiming to raise awareness about the dangers it poses to Virginia’s founding waterway. From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., the two organizations are teaming up to coordinate the activities of volunteers who are being asked use spray paint, stencils, and a little touch of inspiration to create art on the storm drains near Percival’s Island Natural Area (1600 Concord Turnpike). The idea is to bring more attention to the problems caused by chemicals in the rainwater that enter the James River through those drains and makes the waterway a less pleasant place to recreate. Local artists have already created stencils of native plants and animal species for the project. Those stencils and more information can be found  here .

Stormwater runoff isn’t the most publicized environmental threat, so the James River Association and Art on Wheels are aiming to raise awareness about the dangers it poses to Virginia’s founding waterway. From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., the two organizations are teaming up to coordinate the activities of volunteers who are being asked use spray paint, stencils, and a little touch of inspiration to create art on the storm drains near Percival’s Island Natural Area (1600 Concord Turnpike). The idea is to bring more attention to the problems caused by chemicals in the rainwater that enter the James River through those drains and makes the waterway a less pleasant place to recreate. Local artists have already created stencils of native plants and animal species for the project. Those stencils and more information can be found here.

 With summer just around the corner, it’s time for concerts at Riverfront Park (1100 Jefferson St.) to get underway. Today the park hosts the Lynchburg Music Festival, which features local and regional bands doing rock, pop, country, and many other genres. The show starts at 1:30 p.m. with Central Virginia’s Rare Form, a modern country cover band, and ends with a 7-9 p.m. set by the Worx, who do everything from Journey to the Beastie Boys to Zac Brown Band covers. Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the gate. For a list of performers, tickets, and additional info, click  here .

With summer just around the corner, it’s time for concerts at Riverfront Park (1100 Jefferson St.) to get underway. Today the park hosts the Lynchburg Music Festival, which features local and regional bands doing rock, pop, country, and many other genres. The show starts at 1:30 p.m. with Central Virginia’s Rare Form, a modern country cover band, and ends with a 7-9 p.m. set by the Worx, who do everything from Journey to the Beastie Boys to Zac Brown Band covers. Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the gate. For a list of performers, tickets, and additional info, click here.

 Florida’s largest craft brewery brings a few of its featured brews to town tonight for a tasting party at Fifth and Federal Station (801 5th St.). Funky Buddha’s “core” beers include a Floridian Hefeweizen, a Vibin’ Lager, and a Pineapple Beach blond ale. They’ve also got a Maple Bacon Coffee Porter that might pair well with Fifth & Federal’s barbecue-centric menu, or at least with a plate of beignets for desert. Surrender Dorothy is a self-proclaimed "RockaCountryFunkaBilly" band that will do their thing on the outdoor stage from 8 to 11 p.m. Click  here  or call (434) 386-8113 for more info.

Florida’s largest craft brewery brings a few of its featured brews to town tonight for a tasting party at Fifth and Federal Station (801 5th St.). Funky Buddha’s “core” beers include a Floridian Hefeweizen, a Vibin’ Lager, and a Pineapple Beach blond ale. They’ve also got a Maple Bacon Coffee Porter that might pair well with Fifth & Federal’s barbecue-centric menu, or at least with a plate of beignets for desert. Surrender Dorothy is a self-proclaimed "RockaCountryFunkaBilly" band that will do their thing on the outdoor stage from 8 to 11 p.m. Click here or call (434) 386-8113 for more info.

 There’s wearing one’s heart on one’s sleeve, and then there’s just wallowing in it, which can have its charms in the right context. The Virginia-based band  Unlucky and Lonesome  are aiming to find the right context at Kegney Brothers (1118 Main St.) for their bare-bones approach for Appalachian hill country music outfitted with mandolin, acoustic guitar, and upright bass. Local banjo player Matt Steinbach opens the show at 10 p.m. For more information, click  here  or call (434) 616-6691.

There’s wearing one’s heart on one’s sleeve, and then there’s just wallowing in it, which can have its charms in the right context. The Virginia-based band Unlucky and Lonesome are aiming to find the right context at Kegney Brothers (1118 Main St.) for their bare-bones approach for Appalachian hill country music outfitted with mandolin, acoustic guitar, and upright bass. Local banjo player Matt Steinbach opens the show at 10 p.m. For more information, click here or call (434) 616-6691.

 Sometimes the best way to close out the weekend is with a little bit of elemental rock and roll. If we’re to believe their bio (and we do), the British boys in the Struts have opened for the Rolling Stones and Motley Crüe, and they’re part of a small wave of bands from across the pond who have been doing their best to lead a revival of unabashedly retro classic rock. The band only has one studio album to their credit, 2014’s  Everybody Wants , but they’re a road-tested act who have toured with Dave Grohl’s Foo Fighters. Tonight they’re at Phase 2 (4009 Murray Pl.) from 8:30 to 11 p.m. It’s an all-ages show; tickets, which start at $5, can be found  here . Call (434) 846-3206 for more info.

Sometimes the best way to close out the weekend is with a little bit of elemental rock and roll. If we’re to believe their bio (and we do), the British boys in the Struts have opened for the Rolling Stones and Motley Crüe, and they’re part of a small wave of bands from across the pond who have been doing their best to lead a revival of unabashedly retro classic rock. The band only has one studio album to their credit, 2014’s Everybody Wants, but they’re a road-tested act who have toured with Dave Grohl’s Foo Fighters. Tonight they’re at Phase 2 (4009 Murray Pl.) from 8:30 to 11 p.m. It’s an all-ages show; tickets, which start at $5, can be found here. Call (434) 846-3206 for more info.

 The rock gets a little harder, heavier, and more metallic this evening at Phase 2 (4009 Murray Pl.) with the arrival of Florida foursome Trivium. In fine heavy metal tradition, Trivium get their name from a Latin word that referred in medieval times to the study of grammar and rhetoric at the university level. Their sound is derived from the late-’90s heyday of alt-metal, which is when Trivium first broke out of Orlando. Since then they’ve released eight studio albums, including last year’s  The Sin and the Sentence , and racked up a whole shelf-load of  Kerrang!  metal awards. They play from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m., with doors at 6:30. It’s an all-ages show, with  tickets  starting at $5; click  here  or call (434) 846-3206 for more info.

The rock gets a little harder, heavier, and more metallic this evening at Phase 2 (4009 Murray Pl.) with the arrival of Florida foursome Trivium. In fine heavy metal tradition, Trivium get their name from a Latin word that referred in medieval times to the study of grammar and rhetoric at the university level. Their sound is derived from the late-’90s heyday of alt-metal, which is when Trivium first broke out of Orlando. Since then they’ve released eight studio albums, including last year’s The Sin and the Sentence, and racked up a whole shelf-load of Kerrang! metal awards. They play from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m., with doors at 6:30. It’s an all-ages show, with tickets starting at $5; click here or call (434) 846-3206 for more info.

 At any point today between 6 a.m. and 7 p.m., those of you who are registered to vote in the city of Lynchburg can stop by your local voting precincts and cast a ballot that will help place three at-large candidates on the City Council. Every registered voter gets three votes, which can be spread among seven candidates. There are two Democrats (Katie Webb Cyphert and Derek Polley); one Republican (Al Billingsly); two incumbent independents (Treney Tweedy and Randy Nelson); newcomer Beau Wright, who’s running as an independent; and Ceasor Johnson, an independent who is hoping to reclaim a seat after stepping down a few years ago. Find your polling location  here . And check out what the candidates are about through this League of Women Voters of Lynchburg  survey . For more information call the city registrar at (434) 477-5999.

At any point today between 6 a.m. and 7 p.m., those of you who are registered to vote in the city of Lynchburg can stop by your local voting precincts and cast a ballot that will help place three at-large candidates on the City Council. Every registered voter gets three votes, which can be spread among seven candidates. There are two Democrats (Katie Webb Cyphert and Derek Polley); one Republican (Al Billingsly); two incumbent independents (Treney Tweedy and Randy Nelson); newcomer Beau Wright, who’s running as an independent; and Ceasor Johnson, an independent who is hoping to reclaim a seat after stepping down a few years ago. Find your polling location here. And check out what the candidates are about through this League of Women Voters of Lynchburg survey. For more information call the city registrar at (434) 477-5999.

 Along with ballot options, we’ve got pizza options in downtown Lynchburg, thanks to the arrival of Daughters and Sons Pizza (522 5th St.), a newly opened establishment that features Sicilian rather than Neapolitan pizza. If you’re not familiar with the distinction, Neapolitan comes in the familiar round and relatively thin-crusted “pies,” while the Sicilian variety is made in big square pans with a thicker, heartier crust. Chef/owner Jason Arbusto is a VES graduate who apprenticed under several top chefs in France, did time in some of Las Vegas’ finer establishments, had a job at Grateful Dead dude Phil Lesh’s San Francisco eatery Terrapin Crossroads, and recently returned to Lynchburg to set up his own shop. He does a mean  muffuletta  sandwich, some nice looking salads, and big sheets of Sicilian pizza. Today would be a fine day to stop by for lunch or dinner. Daughters and Sons is open from 11 a.m. until 11 p.m., but you may want to call ahead after the dinner rush to make sure they’ve still got dough. The number is (434) 333-4244.

Along with ballot options, we’ve got pizza options in downtown Lynchburg, thanks to the arrival of Daughters and Sons Pizza (522 5th St.), a newly opened establishment that features Sicilian rather than Neapolitan pizza. If you’re not familiar with the distinction, Neapolitan comes in the familiar round and relatively thin-crusted “pies,” while the Sicilian variety is made in big square pans with a thicker, heartier crust. Chef/owner Jason Arbusto is a VES graduate who apprenticed under several top chefs in France, did time in some of Las Vegas’ finer establishments, had a job at Grateful Dead dude Phil Lesh’s San Francisco eatery Terrapin Crossroads, and recently returned to Lynchburg to set up his own shop. He does a mean muffuletta sandwich, some nice looking salads, and big sheets of Sicilian pizza. Today would be a fine day to stop by for lunch or dinner. Daughters and Sons is open from 11 a.m. until 11 p.m., but you may want to call ahead after the dinner rush to make sure they’ve still got dough. The number is (434) 333-4244.

 In the annals of Hollywood blockbusters and might-have-beens, the superhero genre has a long and tangled history that includes the original and quite campy 1966  Batman  film starring Adam West and Burt Ward; Christopher Reeve’s debut as the Man of Steel in 1978’s  Superman ; and the big-screen arrival of lesser-known football star turned crusader in the 1980 movie  Flash Gordon . The latter is a genuine cult classic for good reason: it’s a genuinely strange film produced by Dino De Laurentis, featuring Max von Sydow as the evil Emperor Ming, and introducing the hunky Sam J. Jones as the hunky hero. The special effects are, well, very special by today’s standards. It's good, campy fun, and it happens to feature a soundtrack by the band Queen. What more could one ask for? It’s screening today and tomorrow at Venue Cinemas (901 Lakeside Dr.) at 12:30, 3:15, 6:45, and 9:30 p.m. For ticketing and info, click  here  or call (434) 845-2398

In the annals of Hollywood blockbusters and might-have-beens, the superhero genre has a long and tangled history that includes the original and quite campy 1966 Batman film starring Adam West and Burt Ward; Christopher Reeve’s debut as the Man of Steel in 1978’s Superman; and the big-screen arrival of lesser-known football star turned crusader in the 1980 movie Flash Gordon. The latter is a genuine cult classic for good reason: it’s a genuinely strange film produced by Dino De Laurentis, featuring Max von Sydow as the evil Emperor Ming, and introducing the hunky Sam J. Jones as the hunky hero. The special effects are, well, very special by today’s standards. It's good, campy fun, and it happens to feature a soundtrack by the band Queen. What more could one ask for? It’s screening today and tomorrow at Venue Cinemas (901 Lakeside Dr.) at 12:30, 3:15, 6:45, and 9:30 p.m. For ticketing and info, click here or call (434) 845-2398